Ancestral Notes

My Family History blog

Wordless Wednesday – Easter 1965

me, Easter 1965

My mom made my sister and I matching dresses of pink dotted suisse for Easter in 1965.

Ancestral Notes by Earline Hines Bradt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Filed under: Easter 1965, Wordless Wednesday

Planning My Summer Vacation

We already have our reservations for the campground at Emily Park, just like previous years but it’s the drive home I have to plan for. We are going to go to the renaming of the Steele cemetery and the Doan family reunion on the way home. I’m looking forward to the way home just as much as the week of camping and fishing.

I have a to-do list, which includes a lot of research at the Welland Library, Thorold Library and the Niagara Peninsula Library while I’m in the area. I am making a to-do list for each location, checking out what is available online and copying the information to my Google notebook so that it is accessible on my Blackberry.

I am going to be looking up some newspaper articles about Linus C. Doan in the Welland Tribune Archives as well as any information about my great-grandparents, John & Harriet Hines’ marriage.

I’ll look for land petitions and grants for my early Haines ancestors. I’m gong to look in the 1828 census for more information about Benjamin Haines‘ family, his parents both died when he was a child, I want to find out who he was living with, so I’m going to see if I can find any guardianship records for him and his siblings.

I’m going to research some of my husband’s family too, he is starting to get interested in his ancestry now, but only if someone else does the work, namely me. I am also going to see if I can find what relationship, if any, there is between our Van Alstine ancestors. Benjamin’s sister, Elizabeth, was married to Daniel Van Alstine in Niagara and my husband’s 3rd great-grandmother was Catherine Van Alstine, married to William Bradt in Niagara.

I am going to see if I can get the Titus Doan Family book by inter-library loan, if available, if not I’ll have to check it out while I’m there too. So many things to do, I’ll have to spend an extra day getting it all done.

Ancestral Notes by Earline Hines Bradt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Filed under: genealogy vacation

Sentimental Sunday – Wm. Edgar (Bill) Hines

My brother and I with my grandparents, Bill and Josie Hines
at their home on Arthur Ave.

My grandfather William Edgar (Bill) Hines, was born on March 27, 1894 and passed away on March 29, 1977. Since today is the 28th of March, I thought I would write something about him.

Bill was born in Aldborough Twp., Elgin County, eleventh of thirteen children of John and Harriet Hines. His family moved to Rochester, Essex County by 1897, when his younger brother, Fleming was born. He was in Rochester in 1903, and I suspect that he was one of the brothers mentioned in this next article:

The family moved to Gosfield North, Essex County and Bill was enrolled in the school system in 1905. In January, while walking home from school, he and his little sister ate some blue flax roots and as a result, his sister died. He would have died also, but he was given an emetic and didn’t get as much of the toxic roots in his system.

Bill was married to Josephine Desbiens (Josie), Oct 6, 1917, and worked for the Michigan Central Railway. They lived in the house his father built on Arthur Avenue in Essex.
On Nov. 18, 1921 there was a fire in the house which resulted in the death of their youngest daughter.

They had three more children, a daughter and two sons, the youngest being my father, born in 1926, all born at the family home.

Bill was an avid gardener and bee-keeper. I used to love eating honey right out of the combs when I was young. He was a hunter as well, always having his shotgun beside the side door. I remember one time he brought home a raccoon and my younger sister helped him clean it on the back porch. As usual, after cleaning the hide, he would nail it to the wall of the garage.

Bill smoked a pipe and had a mission-style recliner/rocker that has a hollow in the arm from decades of tapping his pipe when he filled it. After his death, my dad inherited the chair and after my dad died, my brother inherited it.

My grandfather used to play the fiddle, but I never heard him play, he had arthritis in his fingers and was unable to play, but he would bring it out once in a while and show us his violin.
He brought out a large document once in a while to show us as well, saying that it was his father’s from the Orange Lodge.

Since the Great Depression, my grandfather didn’t trust banks and he didn’t believe in credit. It was nothing for him to have a couple of thousand dollars in his wallet. I remember one time, my grandmother was throwing out some newspapers and he put his wallet on the table on top of them. Without looking, she just grabbed the papers and threw them out. After a couple of hours, he went to get his wallet and it was gone. He had $1500 dollars in it and it was already at the dump. He never left his wallet laying around again.

My grandparents rarely drove out of town, my grandfather would go to the Essex Farmers once or twice a week to chat with his friends, my brother went with him but he said it was no place for a girl, so I couldn’t go. On the way home sometimes he would stop at the liquor store and get a bottle. He never brought it into the house, my grandmother wouldn’t allow it, so, whenever he headed out to the garage, we all knew that he was going out for a drink. He would think he was being sneaky but everybody knew what he was up to.

On my grandparents’ 50th wedding anniversary, we had a family dinner at the Aberdeen Hotel to celebrate the occasion. All of my aunts, uncles and cousins as well as more distant relatives attended.

My grandfather died in the home six months before my grandparents’ 60th wedding anniversary, but he didn’t wait, he gave my grandmother her gift early, he managed to buy her a diamond ring, I don’t know how he did it because he was bed-ridden for the last few months of his life. He must have had the jeweller come to the house when my grandmother was out shopping.

Ancestral Notes by Earline Hines Bradt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Filed under: Sentimental Sunday, Wm. E. Hines

Follow Friday – Windows Live Skydrive

Do you need more online storage for your backed up genealogy files and photos? This week I am recommending that you check out Windows Live Skydrive if you haven’t already done so. Skydrive is an online storage service at Windows Live which has a storage capacity of 25 GB. That’s a lot of storage and at a great price, free!

If you have a Windows Live ID, you already have Skydrive, all you do is log in to your windows Live account and go to the “More” tab at the top and Skydrive is there. If you don’t have a Windows Live ID, you can sign up for one.

Ancestral Notes by Earline Hines Bradt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Filed under: online storage, Windows Live Skydrive

Wordless Wednesday – Hellen Keller

Ancestral Notes by Earline Hines Bradt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Filed under: Hellen Keller, Wordless Wednesday

Loyalist Settlers Of The Lost Villages

I had writer’s block, so I decided to pick a year and see what happened in that year of any genealogical significance. I decided to pick the year of my birth, and googled for any events in that year. What I found was that some of the villages on the St. Lawrence River that were founded by early loyalists are now at the bottom of the river.

The Loyalist settlers of this area were disbanded military of the King’s Royal Rangers and Butler’s Rangers. “The Lost Villages” as they are known, consist of Mille Roches, Moulinette, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point, and Aultsville and the hamlets of Maple Grove, Santa Cruz and Woodlands.

On July 1, 1958, while the rest of the country was celebrating Canada Day the inhabitants of these villages were watching as the places they called home were lost forever under the waters of the St.Lawrence in the name of progress.


THE LOYALIST SETTLERS AT MILLE ROCHES

William Claws (Clause) was born in America in 1765, enlisted with the KRRNY on November 13, 1781, and was ranked as an ensign. He was promoted to Lieutenant on August 24, 1783 and was the eighth senior lieutenant in the regiment until its disbandment in 1783. He originally settled in Montreal in 1784, but by 1786 had settled in Royal Township #2.


Abraham Marsh was born circa 1750 and died at Mille Roches, Cornwall Township, on May 8, 1833. He married Catherine French, daughter of Jeremiah French of Maple Grove. On the April 3, 1790 Muster Roll for Cornwall and Osnabruck, Abraham Marsh is listed in Captain Jeremiah French’s Company. He was formerly of the 84th Regiment (Royal Highland Emigrants). Abraham Marsh was buried in Maple Grove Cemetery and his remains and gravestone were moved to the new Maple Grove Cemetery, (Vincent Massey Drive, Cornwall) prior to the inundation of July 1, 1958.

THE LOYALIST SETTLERS OF MOULINETTE

James Forsyth was a Corporal in the King’s Royal Regiment of New York. He settled on Lot No. 30, Royal Township #2, (Cornwall Township) in 1784, with his wife and two daughters.

Jacob Summers was a Corporal in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York, Captain John McDonell’s Company, in 1777. He was a Light Infantryman in 1781 and 1782, and was appointed Corporal of same in 1783. Although drawing a lot in Royal Township #1, (Charlottenburg Township), he was on Lot #30, Concession #1, Township of Cornwall, in 1786.

Barnabus Spencer was born in America in 1761 and his occupation was farming. He enlisted in the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on August 15, 1778. He was a Sergeant in Captain Joseph Anderson’s Company, First Battalion, in 1781 and 1782, and was a Corporal in the Light Infantry in 1783. In 1786, Sergeant Spencer had settled on the east 1/2 of Lot 31, Royal Township #2, (Cornwall Township).

John Connolly was born in Ireland and enlisted in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on November 16, 1781. On that date he was ranked as Ensign, and on November 15, 1782, he was Ensign in Captain Patrick Daly’s Company.

Sir John Johnson, Knight and baronet, was born in America in 1742, and enlisted in the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on June 19, 1776. In 1759, he was a Cadet in the New York Provincials, and by 1763 he was Captain. He was Major-General of the Northern District, New York Militia, in 1776. He was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel and Captain of the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on June 19, 1776, and of the Second Battalion on June 21, 1780. He attained his highest rank as Brigadier-General on October 1, 1782. By 1784, he had acquired lots at Cataraqui, Montreal and Royal Township #1. By 1784, he had married Mary (Polly) Watts and was the father of four sons and one daughter. On March 14, 1782, Johnson was appointed Superintendent and Inspector-General of Indian Affairs and on May 17, 1784, he was appointed Superintendent-General of Refugee Loyalists.

THE LOYALISTS AT DICKINSON’S LANDING

Doctor James Stuart (Discussed under Wales)

James Crowder was a private in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York. He was in Lieutenant-Colonel John Butler’s Corps of Rangers from 1777 to 1781, and in Captain Alexander McDonnell’s First Battalion in 1783. He was a farmer from Susquehanna River, New York, the son of William Crowder sr. He settled in Royal Township #3 with his wife, son, and two daughters.

Jacob Eamon was born in America in 1760 and enlisted in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on May 22, 1780. He was in Captain John Munro’s Company from 1781 to 1783, and in Captain Archibald McDonell’s Company in 1783. He was a farmer in New York.

Joseph Eamon (No information), Possibly the son of Jacob Eamon above.

James Morden (Mordin) was born in America in 1764, and enlisted in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on May 5, 1779. He was in Captain Joseph Anderson’s Company until December 24, 1782, and then Captain Archibald McDonell’s Company in 1783. James Morden was the son of Joseph Morden, from the Mohawk River.

Joseph Fitchet (Fetchet) was born in America in 1765, and enlisted in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on May 16, 1780, as a Private. He was in Captain Joseph Anderson’s Company until December 24, 1782, and then Captain Archibald McDonell’s Company in 1783. His occupation was that of a tailor in New York state.

THE LOYALIST SETTLER OF WALES

Dr. James Stuart was born in Scotland. He enlisted with the 42nd Regiment of Foot in 1766, and served as a surgeon’s mate until his emigration to America. He enlisted with the KRRNY on August 18, 1777. Upon disbandment of the regiment in 1783, he had served for a total of fourteen years under the British ensign. Dr. Stuart had settled in New Stamford, Ulster County, New York. He was a practicing physician in Wales.

THE LOYALIST SETTLERS OF FARRAN’S POINT

Peter Everitt was born in America and enlisted in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on October 28, 1776. He achieved the rank of Second Senior Lieutenant. He was a Volunteer in the Colonel’s Company, Sir John Johnson, in 1776, and promoted to Ensign in the Major’s Company, Major James Gray, on August 24, 1777. He was promoted to Lieutenant on November 14, 1781, and was Lieutenant of the Grenadiers from 1781 to 1783. Peter Everitt was a farmer in New York state.

Jacob Farrand (Farent), was born in America, and enlisted in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on November 2, 1777. He achieved the rank of Seventh Senior Lieutenant in the Regiment. He was a Volunteer in Major James Gray’s Company from 1777-1781. He was promoted to Ensign in this company in 1782, and promoted to Lieutenant on December 25, 1882. He was a Lieutenant in Captain John Munro’s Company in 1783. Jacob Farrand was a nephew of Major James Gray.

THE LOYALIST SETTLERS OF AULTSVILLE

William Empey was born in America in 1759 and enlisted with the Kings Royal Regiment of New York (KRRNY) as a private soldier on August 15, 1777. He originally served with Capt. Angus McDonnell’s Company, and then served as a light infantryman under Capt. Steven Watts until 1781. In 1782 and 1783, he served with Capt. Patrick Daly’s Company. William, a carpenter by trade, was the son of Philip Empey Sr., of Stone Arabia, New York. He settled in Royal Township #2 with his wife, Catterina Von Hildenbrandt, and their two sons.

Abraham Freeze was born in America in 1757 and enlisted with the KRRNY on January 22, 1777 as a private soldier. He originally served in Capt. Stephen Watts Light Company, and later as a grenadier with Capt. Jon McDonald’s Grenadier Company. In 1779, he served as a scout to the Mohawk Valley, prior to the 1780 raid on Johnstown and the subsequent burning of the valley. Abraham was a farmer in New York State before moving to Canada.

Francis Albrant (Albraut) was born in America in 1754 and enlisted as a Private in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on June 19, 1776. He was a Grenadier in 1782 and 1783. He was a farmer from Tryon County, New York.

Alexander Rose (Ross) was born in Scotland in 1760 and enlisted as a Drummer in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on September 13, 1779. He was a Drummer from 1781 to 1783. Alexander Rose was a farmer in New York state.

Michael Ault (Alt) was born in America in 1759 and enlisted as a Private in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on May 6, 1777. He served as a Grenadier from 1781 to 1783 and was also a farmer from Tryon County, New York.

Loyalist Settler of Hamlet of Maple Grove

Captain Jeremiah French, late of the Kings Royal Regiment of New York, and of Manchester, Vermont, settled the hamlet of Maple Grove in 1784. French built a magnificent house at the mouth of Robertson Creek and later sold it to his son-in-law George Robertson, also a UEL refugee from Vermont. The French-Robertson House can now be viewed at Upper Canada Village.

Captain French originally served with the Queens Loyal Rangers and was taken prisoner by the Americans at the battle of Bennington. As a condition of his release, he was ordered not to take up arms against the rebel uprising in Vermont, so he made his way to New York and subsequently joined the KRRNY, under command of Sir John Johnson.

The Lost Villages Historical Society has a lot of great photos and stories from the people that once lived in the villages.


Ancestral Notes by Earline Hines Bradt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Filed under: Lost Villages, St. Lawrence Seaway, United Empire Loyalist

Community Newspaper -The Essex County Crier

What do you know, one of my blog posts may be read in half the households county-wide! An employee of the new local newspaper, The Essex County Crier, just contacted me via Facebook asking if their paper could publish one of my blog posts about Leamington. They are interested in discovering and sharing the history and heritage of Essex County with the residents of the county.

We as a family of Essex County give this
publication to the people who live here.
We are only stewards of this gateway.”


The Purpose

Hope - To raise the ambition of our great community, create a want for achievement and endurance when hard times fall.

Inspiration - To awaken our minds that we may gain enthusiasm for life!

Unity – The emergence of community revival for strength, pride and harmony.

The Goal

“To bring awareness and pride to Essex County through inspired and well informed articles.

To provide a quality platform with which business and the consumer are united.”

” While The Crier cannot exist without its advertisers, it is designed to be an actual newspaper and not a shopper….give us your patience as readers and we will ultimately deliver an interesting, attractive and quality newspaper to your door. Besides providing your patience, The Crier is also calling for your stories, ideas, recipes, photographs, and help. These submissions from you will truly make the Crier Essex County’s premiere community newspaper.”

By Shayne Bedal
The Essex County Crier

The Essex County Crier is a free, bi-monthly newspaper delivered via Canada Post and available at news stands in the county. Even the way it is distributed is unique. It will be delivered to every house once a month, the mail routes are split, so that 1/2 of the community gets one issue and the rest get the next issue. This way, the paper will reach every household and it is suggested that you go a few blocks over and exchange papers, which should create a greater sense of community.

The Crier’s first edition has a lot of good articles, about endangered heritage sites, history of the natives who lived in the county, the wine industry, gardening, recipes, a self-improvement series and a photo gallery. I wonder what will be in the next edition, I’ll have to find out where it is being delivered and go for a little walk!

The Essex County Crier can be found on Facebook and on Twitter.

Ancestral Notes by Earline Hines Bradt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Filed under: Essex County Crier.history

I Found It!

After all of the worry about not being able to see the front page of the newspaper that had my great-grandmother’s obituary on it, I went and downloaded the whole issue of the paper and there it was. And as I suspected, it had more conflicting information in it.

It states that the family came to Essex in 1883, but they were in Aldborough Twp., Elgin County in 1891 in the census. My grandfather was born there in the spring of 1893. They came to Essex County between March of 1893 and January of 1897 when their son, Fleming W. was born in Rochester. It states that she was born in Welland, in 1853, but the censuses state she was born in 1854 in the USA. At least I found out her cause of death was cancer.

related posts: Evidence Unexplained, Who Was Harriet’s Father?

Ancestral Notes by Earline Hines Bradt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Filed under: Hines obit

Wordless Wednesday – My Irish Ancestors,The Stevensons

James Stevenson immigrated from County Armagh, Ireland with his wife, Elizabeth Cowan Stevenson and three daughters, Mary, Sarah and Elizabeth. I posted their 50th Wedding announcement earlier.

photos from public member tree on Ancestry.ca.

Ancestral Notes by Earline Hines Bradt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Filed under: The Stevensons, Wordless Wednesday

St. Patrick’s Day Parade at Small-Leaved Shamrock!

How are you spending St. Patrick’s Day this year? Are you going to go out for a pint of green beer or maybe having corned beef and cabbage?

I am going to the 3rd Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade hosted by Small-Leaved Shamrock, I’m just an observer this year so I’m going to just relax and enjoy. Come join me for some old-fashioned Irish fun!!


Carnival of Irish Heritage and Culture – St. Patrick’s Day Parade 2008 & 2009.

Ancestral Notes by Earline Hines Bradt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Filed under: Carnival of Irish Heritage and Culture, Small-Leaved Shamrock, St. Patrick's Day parade

March 2010
S M T W T F S
« Feb   Apr »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.