Ancestral Notes

My Family History blog

Joseph Haines, Sr., UEL, my 4th great-grandfather

Joseph Haines, Sr. was born in Germany and immigrated to New York about 1760. He had a lease from Sir Wm. Johnson for a tract of 100 acres of land in Tryon County at a cost of 6 pounds a year. There, he raised seven children until the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, when his three sons went to serve in the King’s Royal Regiment of New York. One of his sons was killed. He later joined John Butler’s Corp of Rangers along with two of his three remaining sons. He and his family fled to Quebec with the Butler’s Rangers in 1781 and remained at Lachine for four years until they settled in the Niagara region.
Joseph Haines and son-in-law, Peter Whitney,purchased a mill at the Four-Mile creek in 1801. It was deeded to his grandson, James Haines, son of Philip, in 1818 after Philip’s death in a fire in York.

Joseph Haines, Sr and ?? had the following children:

i. Nathaniel Haines, born about 1765

ii. ______ Haines, died in Rev. war

iii. Joseph Haines, Jr., born about 1767, died Sept. 21, 1853

iv. Margaret Haines, born about 1777

v. Philip Haines, born about 1779

vi. Sarah Haines, born about 1768, died 1852

vi.Mary Haines, born about 1783, died June 5, 1849

United Empire Loyalists, Part II
The Evidence.

988. Claim of

Name: Jos. Hanes , late of Tryon Co.
Claimt. says he was at Le Chine in Fall
’83 & the ensuing Winter.

Is a Nat. of Germ.
Came to America 23 years ago.
Lived at Johnstown on the Mohawk .
Came into Canada in ’81 .
Three sons joined Sir John Johnson , 1 was killed; two others served till end of the War.

Came into Canada because the Rebels persecuted him.
They would have taken his life if he had not came away.
Lives 4 miles from
Montreal , but has land in 4 Township.

Had a Lease from Sir Wm. Johnston of 100 acres,
Lease forever, paying Rent £6 pr. ann.
Cleared 50 acres.
Built house, Barn, &c., planted an orchard.
Lost his utensils, furniture, 3 Horses, 3 Cows, 24 sheep, grain, 300 Boards.
The Rebels took some, but his wife disposed of some & brought some to
Canada .

‘An Annotated Nominal Roll of the Butler’s Rangers 1777-1784 with Documentary Sources”
Lieutenand Colonel William A. Smy, OMM,CD,UE

Haines, Joseph. Private. [“Hains”,” Haynes”]Senior. From Tryon County, NY, where he had 100 acres from Sir William Johnson. His three sons served in the King’s Royal Regiment of New York. In Sep 1783, he and his wife, one boy and three girls over twelve, were drawing rations as refugees in Quebec. Settled at Lachine, Quebec. In Jan. 1797 he petitioned for land stating that he had arrived in the Province in 1786 with a wife and six children. To date, he had only received 200 acres on land in the Township of Niagara. he was granted an additional 350 acres as family lands. He estimated his war losses at 265 pounds sterling ($19,810 in 1991 US dollars). Children: Nathaniel, Joseph, Mary, Margaret, Sarah, Philip. All born in New York colony. Philip, Sarah and Mary granted land as children of UE Loyalist.

Sources:A. British Library -(26) – ADD MSS* – 21826. Return of Loyalists in Canada, 1778-1782.
C. Return Sep 1783
(* these Additional Manuscripts (ADD MSS) are commonly referred to as the Haldimand Papers)
D. Ontario Archives –
(2) Reports of the Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario
G – Nineteenth Report (Toronto 1930)

E. Published Secondary Sources –
(13) – The Old United Empire Loyalists List (Toronto 1885)
(93) – Gregory Palmer. Biographical Sketches of Loyalists of the American Revolution (London, 1984) (100) – Thomas L. Purvis. Revolutionary America, 1763-1800: Almanacs of American Life (New York, 1995)

Old United Empire Loyalists List – served with Butler’s Rangers, Ontario People 1796 -1803 -E.Keith Fitzgerald

Here are excerpts from the book “Millers of the Humber Valley, a study of Early Economy of Canada” by Sidney Thomas Fisher: Haines Mill-
On 6 December 1798 John Lawrence’s grist mill on east bank of the Humber (Toronto) near the road to the ferry and including 30 acres on the west bank of the river, between the 2 roads was sold to Peter Whitney and Joseph Haines for 60 pounds, a fair indication that it was heavily encumbered with debt.(pg 60)”Information as to the location of early roads is so sketchy that one must give approximations. In this case, Lawrence specifically mentions the Lake Shore road. The other was probably one later known as the ‘Middle Road’ which was followed roughly in building the present Queen Elizabeth Highway. (#1,pg 167)
On November 2, 1799, John Dennis charged Reuben Riggs, a carpenter of York, with theft of timber that had come from his shipyard.In January 1800, Riggs was acquitted, “Dennis was on dangerous ground in attempting a prosecution, as his own actions were not above suspicion. In 1791 his neighbour, Joseph Haines, complained to Lieutenant-Governor Peter Hunter that Dennis had no authority to cut timber on private property, Haines wisely let the matter drop. If Dennis was guilty, he was not the only offender, for in 1811, long after Dennis had left the Humber, Philip Haines, who had taken over most of his father’s property was threatening to prosecute lumber thieves.” (pg 53-54)

“Joseph Haines and his family had made steady progress in developing the mill and surrounding property. Peter Whitney, Haines’s partner in the purchase from Lawrence’s executors, had left the Humber. He had sold his interest to Haines on 7 July 1801 and on 8 May 1807 he sold the adjoining lots which he had bought from John Wilson on 25 May 1800 to Joseph Haines Jr. The two Haines then owned all property on the east bank of the Humber from John Dennis’s shipyard to the Dundas Street crossing, where there was an excellent mill-site which Joseph Haines Jr. wold to William Cooper on 9 May 1807. Cooper promptly erected a grist mill and developed the property so energetically that he place the Haines mill at a disadvantage. In 1815, Joseph Haines Jr., who had gone to Niagara to live, sold the rest of the former Willson property to Cooper.

Joseph Haines showed considerable courage in buying Peter Whitney’s share of the grist mill, carrying on the business with the aid on his son Philip, because after Willson left the King’s Mill the prospects of development there had faded, although William Jarvis was carrying on a commercial fishery at the mouth of the Humber and John Dennis was busily employed in his shipyard. With Joseph Haines Jr. in possession of the lands to his north, it looked as though the mill might be able to attract customers from that area and the settlement would be developed south and west along the road leading from “the head of the lake” (Burlington Bay) to York. He could not know that once John Dennis had served the government purpose in building a few vessels, the shipyard would be left idle and incorporated into a reserve that was to be hoarded by the government until the middle of the nineteenth century.

“From 1800 until 1807, prospects were good for the Haines Mill. Joseph Haines built a road from his mill to lot 36 where it connected with the road to the ferry. Until 1804 the ferry road was little more than an ill-kept track, but for the next two years there was steady improvements as Joseph Burton and his men widened and drained it, under a contract from the Commissioner of Roads, and ever inveiled some of his men into making some necessary improvements west of the Humber through the hitherto barely drained reserve. Burton had told these men that William Allan, one of the Commissioners for Roads, would pay them and Allan finally agreed to do so. These improvements contributed to the success that Clark and Lymburners had in attracting customers to the rebuilt King’s mill. Although the Lymburners continued to attract customers to the area until 1810, Haines began to feel the effects of competition from the two mills at Dundas Street by 1808 and , for a time, there was some competition at Weston where Conrad Countryman ran a small grist mill for which he was given the irons and millstones in 1807. Weston, however, did not become a real competitor on grist milling until 1819.

On 28 November 1810 Joseph Haines braced himself to meet competition by turning the grist mill over to his son Philip who added a saw mill. The heavy increase in lumbering that preceded the War of 1812 made plenty of work for all available mills. Meanwhile, Joseph Haines was providing custom for the grist mill by developing the agricultural potential of his property in a way that attracted tenant farmers, one of whom seems to have been John Chilson. When Philip Haines died on 22 July, 1818, Joseph deeded the mill property to James, Philip’s son. In this deed he should point with pride to the houses, outhouses, barns, stables, gardens and orchards that had transformed the place since Lawrence’s time . A cherry orchard on this property was said to date from Jean-Baptiste Rousseau’s tenure during the French regime.

Shortly before Joseph Haines made over the southern part of his property to his grandson, James he sold the northern portion to Daniel Tiers, an innkeeper. Two years later, this northern portion was bought by the Hon. James Baby, who’s name has become attached to the promontory that distinguishes it, Baby Point had sheltered the mill since John Lawrence had built it, and was to continue to do so, first for the Haines family then for two distinguished millwrights, Friend Wilcox and Rowland Burr and finally for William Gamble. The activities of Wilcox, Burr and Gamble belong to a later stage of the milling economy.

“By the time James Haines took over the mill, the grist mill at Dundas Street had so far outstripped him it is probable he confined himself to saw-mill operations. Hemmed in as he was with large reserves south of him and on the west bank opposite to him, he had little opportunity to expand. His uncle had sold the northern mill-site and its lands to Cooper and very little had been done to keep up the road to the ferry, In spite of the hard work that the Haines family had put into the mill and surrounding property, the Magistrates, in Quarter Sessions, dealt them a severe blow. In 1810 the overseer of the roads for the Humber was directed to use all the road money and all labour due from the settlers west of York in building and improving a road from James Given’s house in Lot (Queen) Street to the Dundas Street bridge where William Cooper’s mills were operating. How the Haines mill fared after it had been bypased so thoroughly, one does not know. The records are silent.”( pgs 61-65.)

“Philip Haines, son of Joseph Haines, had a grist mill on the Humber early in 1811′ The Lymburners had left their mill after a dispute over rent taking the logging chain with them. One of the settlers was seen carrying off two of the windows and it was suspected that a missing mill saw from Lymburners mill was in operation at Philip Haines’ mill on the east bank. (pg 46)

On 25 November 1815 Cooper paid Joseph Haines Jr. 320 pounds for all of Lot 5 and the remainder of Lot 4.”(pg 68)

The prices indicate that Haines had made considerable improvements on this land. The deeds are in YCRO, Old York Registry, nos.2620,3915.”(#31 pg 168)

While he lived at the King’s Mill (Thomas ) Fisher’s nearest neighbors, Joseph Haines and John William Gamble, were not men with whom he could carry on a general and informed conversation; Haines lacked education and Gamble, although he had been educated at Rev. John Strachan’s famous school at Cornwall, had too many irons in the fire to keep up an interest in books. Fisher and his other friends got much of their indoor relaxation from the books that they had bought and frequently loaned to one another.” (pg 112)

About 1837 Friend Wilcox, a competent millwright, rebuilt James Haines’s mill on the east bank of the river opposite Milton. Wilcox took a lien on the property in 1839 and he was followed by Rowland Burr in 1840.” (pg 118)

In 1851 he (John William Gamble, Esq,. of Estibicoke took over James Haines’s saw mill on the east bank and transferred his own saw-mill operations to the Haines mill. Haines began to operate a tavern on Gamble’s Dundas Street property.”( pg 139-140)

The arrangements to take over the mills were made by 1851, Haines appears in the census of that year as a tavern keeper on Lot 10, Con. C, Etibicoke and Gamble is listed as the owner of Haines’ mill lot. The sale, however, did not go through until 28 March 1853, see YCRO, Old York Registry, no. 48528.” (pg 175)

“Some of Thomas Fisher’s books have been preserved and are now held in the Humber Archives.”( #3, pg 172)

Orders In Council:

This article was written in springnote.

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Filed under: Family Files, Genealogy, Haines/Hines, Loyalists, , ,

Josephine Desbiens

My grandparents, Joephine Desbiens & Wm. Hines with my older brother, Fleming, and I.

My grandmother, Josephine Desbiens was born in 1897 in Essex County, the daughter of John Desbiens And Celinase Tremblay. She grew up on her father’s farm in Maidstone Twp., Essex County with several brothers and sisters.
She married William Edgar Hines, son of John Haines and Harriet Doan of Rochester, in 1917 and moved to Essex in the house that her husband and his brother built. He worked for the railroad, so he built his garage from railroad ties. The railroad ran right behind their property. It was a modest house on Arthur Avenue in the town of Essex. It was well-taken care of, but showed the efects of the history of the town and railway, the walls weren’t square, as a result of a nitro-glycerine explosion in a traincar at the railyard. Most of the homes in town at that time were moved from their foundation a little that day.
That was not the only incident in the house, while my grandmother was out hanging laundry, the house caught fire with their two daughters inside. The oldest daughter was able to get out, but the youngest daughter died of burns. They had three more children after that, a daughter and two sons.
She passed away on July 4, 1994 at the age of 97.


Filed under: Desbiens, Family Files, Genealogy, Haines/Hines, Tremblay, , , ,

My New Look


I noticed while reading the blogs, quite a few of them were using the same template as mine, so I decided to create a unique banner for my site, with family photos, to make it a little more unique. I didn’t change the colour scheme, I picked this theme because I liked the colours, but I had to change the font colour in the title as it didn’t show up well.

Filed under: Blogging,

Pierre Tremblay

My immigrant ancestor, Pierre Tremblay, from Ste-Malo-de-Randonnay, Tourouvre, France, was the son of Gilbert Tremblay and Jeanne Coignet.

Pierre Tremblay entered the service of Noel Jurecheau, who was enlisting men to go to New France, signing a three year contract, along with his guardian, Martin Huot, April 9, 1647. He required the permission of his mother to go, as he was 21 and the age of majority at that time in France was 25.
He set sail from France in early June on one of three ships sailing to the New World.

They arrived in Quebec in August, 1647. Pierre decided to stay in New France after his three year contract. After some time, he decided to settle down, but French women were hard to find in New France, so he waited for ships to bring eligible women from France, the “filles du roi”, who were sent by the King along with a small dowry.
In 1657 there were 18 filles du roi sent to Quebec, one was Ozanne Achon, 24, from St. Pierre Avand, LaRochelle, Aunis, France, who was the daughter of Jean Achon and Helene Regnaude.

La Rochelle Harbour

They took a liking to each other, and on October 2, 1657, they were married.


marriage record of Pierre Tremblay and Ozanne Achon, Oct. 2, 1657


Pierre Tremblay was one of the first

colonists in L’Ainge Guardien, P.Q.


Statue of Pierre Tremblay

Filed under: Family Files, Genealogy, Tremblay, , , , ,

My Kreativ Blogger Award


Sheri Bush at Twig Talk has presented me with this award. Thank you Sheri !

Here are the instructions:
1. Copy the award to your site.

2. Link to the person from whom you received the award.

3. Nominate 7 other bloggers. (how to choose only 7!!)

4. Link to those sites on your blog.

5. Leave a message on the blogs you nominate.

Here is my list of nominees:
1. Bluebonnet Country Genealogy
2. Jackson County Journal
3. They That Go Down To The Sea
4. The Research Journal
5. Seeking Your Own Legend
6. Writing Your Memories

There are a lot of great blogs, Almost all the blogs I read had their Kreativ Blogger Award already.

Filed under: Blogging, Kudos, ,

We Met For The First Time …… Again

My husband in front of Butler’s Barracks,
Niagara-on-the-lake, Ontario

I met my husband for the first time in April of 1998, but something about him seemed so familiar, like we’ve known each other all our lives. As I started researching my family history, I researched his family, the Bradts. I discovered that several of his ancestors were Loyalists, and they served in John Butler’s Corp of Rangers. As a matter of fact, John Butler was married to Catherine Bradt.

I soon was reading all about the Butler’s Rangers and even bought a few books so that I could learn more about them, Ontario People 1796-1803 transcribed and annotated by E. Keith Fitzgerald, Butler’s Rangers, The Revolutionary Period by E. Cruikshank, and a few months ago, An Annotated Nominal Roll of the Butler’s Rangers 1777 – 1784 With Documentary Sources compiled and arranged by Lt.-Col. William A. Smy, OMM, CD, UE.

I learned a lot about where his family came from and where they ended up. Before the Revolutionary war, they lived in Tryon County, New York in the Mohawk Valley. They joined Butler’s Rangers and after the war, they were granted land in the Home District (Niagara region).

When I started reading my latest book, I discovered that my loyalist Haines ancestors came from the Mohawk Valley before the war. They came from Germany about 1760, in all likelyhood, at the request of Sir William Johnson, who wanted to create a town by inviting Scottish and German families to immigrate and lease land from him. According to the book, Joseph Haines, Sr. leased 100 acres from Sir Wiliam Johnson, and raised his family of seven there until the revolutionary war broke out. He and his sons served in the Butler’s Rangers, alongside the Bradts. They went to Lachine, Quebec with the Rangers at the end of the war and were granted land in the Home District.

My great-grandfather was born and raised in Niagara Twp., and moved to Elgin County in the 1880’s and to Essex County in the 1890’s. My husband’s family came from the Niagara area to Haldimand County in the 1870’s and then to Essex County in the 1890’s.

So, it seems like our ancestors were neighbours and possibly friends, so I like to think that it was with some help from both fo our ancestors that we met, and now, five generations later, the Bradt and Haines families are reunited.

Filed under: Brat/Bradt, Family Files, Genealogy, Haines/Hines, Loyalists, , , , , , , ,

Deacon John Doane – Plymouth Colony Records

JOHN DOANE

ORIGIN: England
MIGRATION: 1630
FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth
REMOVES: Eastham 1645
OCCUPATION: Yeoman, innkeeper. (On 4 June 1639 “Mr. John Done is allowed to draw wine until the next Court, that further order may be taken therein” [ PCR 1:127]; on 2 June 1640 “we present Mr. Done for selling wine contrary to order made by the Court. It was mistaken by the grand inquest, and so he was discharged by the Court the 3d September 1640, and appointed by the Court to be thus erased out” [PCR 1:156]. On 7 January 1644/5, Doane agreed to let James Cole “take off those wines he now hath in his hands” [PCR 2:79-80]).
CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: 2 January 1633/4: “Mr. John Done, being formerly chosen to the office of a deacon in the church, at the request of the church & himself was freed from the office of an Assistant in the commonwealth” [PCR 1:23].
On 18 April 1642, John Done, agent for the church of Plymouth, purchased from Mr. Ralph Smith a house, buildings, and garden plots in Plymouth, also six acres of upland in the new field [PCR 12:79-80]. The same year, Doane turned this property over to “Mr. John Reynor their teacher” [PCR 12:87].
FREEMAN: In “1633” Plymouth list of freemen, ahead of those made free 1 January 1632/3 [PCR 1:3]; in lists of 7 March 1636/7 [PCR 1:52]; in Plymouth section of Plymouth colony list of 1639 (as “Mr. John Done”), from which he was erased and reentered in the Eastham section of the same list [PCR 8:173, 177]; in Eastham section of lists of 1658, 29 May 1670 and 1 [blank] 1683/4 [PCR 5:278, 8:201, 208].
EDUCATION: Appointment to committee to revise laws indicates considerable education.
OFFICES: Plymouth Colony Council, 1 January 1632/3 [PCR 1:5]. Committee to divide meadow ground, 1 July 1633, 2 October 1637 [PCR 1:14, 67]. Committee to assess taxes, 2 January 1633/4, 2 March 1635/6 [PCR 1:26, 38]. Committee to collect money for building a mill, 5 July 1635 [PCR 1:35]. Committee to regulate prices and wages, 5 January 1635/6 [PCR 1:36]. Committee to revise laws, 4 October 1636, 6 May 1639 [PCR 1:44, 121]. Committee on trade with the Indians, 7 March 1636/7 [PCR 1:54]. Committee to lay out highways, 2 May 1637, 1 February 1640/1 [PCR 1:58, 2:7]. Committee on beaver trade, 7 June 1637 [PCR 1:62]. Coroner’s jury, 5 June 1638 [PCR 1:88].

Plymouth deputy to General Court, 4 June 1639, 7 June 1642, 27 September 1642, 6 June 1643, 29 August 1643, 10 October 1643, 5 March 1643/4, 5 June 1644 (but did not attend) [PCR 1:126, 2:40, 45, 57, 59, 60, 63, 68, 72]. Deputy for Nawset, 6 June 1649, 4 June 1650 [PCR 2:144, 154]. Deputy for Eastham, 5 June 1651, 6 April 1653, 7 June 1653, 7 June 1659 [PCR 2:168, 3:24, 32, 162]. Auditor, 7 September 1641, 3 March 1644/5 [PCR 2:24, 82]. Grand jury, 2 June 1640, 2 March 1640/1 [PCR 1:155, 2:11]. Petit jury, 7 March 1636/7, 2 October 1637, 2 January 1637/8, 6 March 1637/8, 4 September 1638, 3 March 1639/40, 5 October 1640, 6 September 1641, 7 December 1641, 3 Mary 1642, 1 November 1642, 5 November 1644, 3 March 1644/5, 1 March 1652/3, 2 October 1660 [PCR 3:200, 7:5, 7-9, 16, 17, 23, 25, 28, 29, 32, 38, 40, 64].

On 24 January 1641/2, “Mr. John Done” was one of four men elected to head committees to supply six muskets with shot, powder, and swords every Lord’s day “ready for service if need require” [PCR 2:31].

On 1 June 1663 the court appointed Mr. John Doane to “administer marriage in Eastham for the next year, also to administer oath to witnesses before grand enquest, and other witnesses” [PCR 4:43].

In Plymouth section of 1643 Plymouth Colony list of men able to bear arms [PCR 8:188].

It is very likely that the following service belongs to his son of the same name: Eastham selectman, 5 June 1677, 5 June 1678, 3 June 1679, 1 June 1680, 7 June 1681, 6 June 1682, 6 June 1683, 3 June 1684, 2 June 1685 [PCR 5:230, 257, 6:10, 35, 59, 84, 108, 129, 164, 168, 186].

Eastham constable, 7 June 1676 [PCR 5:196].

Eastham highway surveyor, 5 June 1672, 3 June 1673, 5 June 1677 [PCR 5:93, 115, 232].

Deputy for Eastham, 6 June 1682 [PCR 6:85].

ESTATE: “John Done” was assessed £1 7s. in the Plymouth tax lists of 25 March 1633 and 27 March 1634 [PCR 1:9, 27].

On 14 February 1633/4 purchased of John Coombs for £9 10s. “a dwelling house & misted with the inclosure & outhousing thereunto belonging” [PCR 1:25].

Allotted mowing ground, 14 March 1635/6, 20 March 1636/7 [PCR 1:40, 56].

On 30 December 1636 whereas “the now dwelling house with all & singular the outhousing, lands & enclosures in the use & occupation of John Done, of Plymouth, near unto Plain Dealing, were in parnership between the said John Done & John Atwood, late of London, gent., now know ye that upon accounts between the said Joh. & John, the said John Atwood, for & in consideration of threescore pounds, hath bought out the said John Done, his heirs & assigns, so that it remaineth wholly to the said John Atwood & his heirs forever” [PCR 1:47].

On 2 October 1637 granted ten acres “to belong to his house at Plymouth”, and one hundred acres at Jones River [PCR 1:65-66].

On 4 December 1637 he was granted ten acres [PCR 1:69].

On 4 February 1638/9 he was granted one hundred acres, partly to make up for portions of an earlier grant which he had remitted [PCR 1:111-12].

On 1 June 1640 he was granted ten acres of meadow [PCR 1:154].

On 2 November 1640 he was granted ten acres meadow in the North Meadow [PCR 1:166].

On 7 April 1642, “Mr. John Done” sold to Mr. William Bradford for four goats, a garden in Plymouth, also three acres of marsh bought of Thomas Willet [PCR 12:79].

On 19 February 1645/6, “Mr. John Done” sold to Mr. William Hanbury of Plymouth his dwelling house and garden places, barn and buildings, with all the fruit trees, the corn now growing in the garden excepted with some half dozen small fruit trees, to be given to Doane in the fall or spring [PCR 12:133-34].

On 6 October 1657, Mr. John Done and others petitioned to acquire land thirteen English miles from Rehoboth, and the court gave them permission to purchase it from the Indians [PCR 3:123]. On 1 June 1658, a portion of land was granted by the Court to “Mr. John Done” and others, between Bridgewater and Weymouth [PCR 3:142].

On 5 June 1666 the court, having granted him one hundred acres of upland at “Pottamumaquate Neck” and six acres of meadow there, ordered Lt. Freeman and Josias Cooke to view and buy it for him [PCR 4:131].

On 1 April 1659 “Mr. John Done” of Eastham, yeoman, “with the consent of his wife mistris Lydia Done,” sold to “Mrs. Allis Bradford Senior of Plymouth, widow, … all that his tract and parcel of land lying at Jones River in the township of Plymouth aforesaid, being an hundred acres” of upland and meadow, which had been sold to William Bradford Senior during his lifetime but not confirmed until this date [ PCLR 2:2:20]. By the time Bradford’s son Joseph took this land, the boundaries were lost and it had to be re-surveyed in 1699 [ PTR 1:268-69].

At an unknown date (but acknowledged 2 July 1669) “John Doan” of Eastham, husbandman, exchanged land with “Richard Higgens” of Eastham, Doane receiving three acres of meadow and Higgins receiving four acres of meadow at Billingsgate [PCLR 5:140].

On 23 December 1681 “John Done Gent., tailor, of Eastham” for “love and natural affection” gave to “my daughter Abigaill Done … my dwelling house with all the upland about the said house,” about twelve acres, with two acres of meadow, in Eastham [PCLR 5:89].

In his will, dated 18 May 1678 and proved 2 June 1686, “John Doane of Eastham, aged eighty and eight years or there about,” bequeathed to “my loving wife” my dwelling house in Eastham with all the upland and meadow about it and two acres at a place called the Acres, and all personal estate for life; to “daughter Abigail Doane” the house and land at her mother’s death; to “son John Doane,” sole executor, twenty-seven acres of upland, eight acres at Poche Island, all my right in Eastham being a town purchaser, also one hundred acres granted by the Plymouth court “by his majesty’s order invested with power to do equity and justice to his poor distressed subjects”, also my great table and form; to “son Daniel Doane” the land he now lives on and twenty acres near the dry swamp and four and a half acres of meadow; to “son Ephraim Doane” twenty acres of upland and four acres of meadow at Little Billingsgate; to “granddaughter Margaret Hicks” a trunk and a pair of sheets; residue at wife’s death divided equally among all the sons and daughters [ MD 3:177, citing BarnPR 1:10].

The inventory of “Mr. John Doane deceased the 21th of February 1685 aged about a hundred years” was taken 21 May 1686 by Joseph Snow and Joshua Bangs and totalled £10 16s. 7d. [MD 3:178, citing BarnPR 1:11].

BIRTH: About 1590 (based on age given when he wrote his will).
DEATH: Eastham 21 February 1685[/6] [MD 3:178, citing BarnPR 1:11], “aged about a hundred years” [sic].
MARRIAGE: (1) By 4 December 1648 Ann _____ (and by 1625 if she was the mother of his children) (signed a deed dated 4 December 1648 [ Dawes-Gates 304, citing Eastham TR]); she died by 1659.
(2) By 1 April 1659 Lydia_____ [MD 13:232, citing PCLR 2:2:20]. She was living on 18 May 1678 when she was named in her husband’s will, but was presumably deceased by 23 December 1681 when property he left to her in the will was deeded by him to his daughter Abigail [PCLR 5:89].

CHILDREN:
i LYDIA, b. say 1625; m. Plymouth 11 September 1645 Samuel Hicks [PCR 2:88], son of ROBERT HICKS.

ii ABIGAIL, b. about 1631; m. in early 1690s Samuel Lothrop of Norwich, son of Rev. John Lothrop; d. Norwich 23 January 1734/5 “in the 104th year if her age” [Norwich Hist 218, illustration of tombstone]. “Mrs. Abigail Lothrop died at Norwich Jan. 23, 1735 in her 104th year. Her father John Done and his wife came to Plymouth in 1630, and there she was born the next year. She lived single till 60 years old and then married Mr. John Lothrop [mistake for Samuel Lothrop] of Norwich, who lived ten years and then died” [Norwich Hist 578, citing Boston Weekly Journal]. (Ferris gives a birthdate of 13 January 1631/2 which is not found in the records, and may be an inaccurate calculation based on the tombstone [Dawes-Gates 2:305].)

iii JOHN, b. say 1635; m. (1) Eastham 30 April 1662 Hannah Bangs [MD 8:89], daughter of EDWARD BANGS; m. (2) 14 January 1684[/5] Rebecca Pettee [MD 8:89].

iv DANIEL, b. about 1637 (d. Eastham 20 December 1712 in his 76th year [MD 8:3]); m. (1) by 1669 _____ _____ (child b. 7 March 1669/70 [PCR 8:57; MD 19:111]); m. (2) after 28 July 1682 Hepsibah (Cole) Crispe. (Hepzibah Cole, daughter of Daniel Cole of Eastham, had married at Eastham 24 May 1677 George Crisp, and he had died there 28 July 1682 [MD 3:180]; in the distribution of the estate of Daniel Cole, dated 15 January 1694/5, the list of heirs included “Daniel Doan and his wife Hipsibath” [MD 23:67, citing BarnPR 1:107; see also Dawes-Gates 2:305].)

v EPHRAIM, b. say 1642; m. (1) Eastham 5 February 1667[/8] Mercy Knowles [PCR 8:57]; m. (2) after 1692 Mary (Smalley) Snow.

ASSOCIATIONS: Twice in the 1630s John Doane acted jointly with John Atwood of London. On 8 April 1633, as agent of Mr. John Atwood of London, John Doane sold to Henry Howland the remaining time of Walter Harris [PCR 1:12-13]. Doane and Atwood had held a piece of land as partners, but on 30 December 1636, probably not long after he had arrived in New England, Atwood bought out Doane [PCR 1:47]. They do not seem to have interacted after that date.

The widow Martha Harding may have been John Doane’s sister [Dawes-Gates 2:302].
COMMENTS: On 28 October 1633 “John Done” presented the inventory of Martha Harding [PCR 1:18], and on 11 November 1633, with Stephen Hopkins, the inventory of Godbert Godbertson and Sarah his wife [PCR 1:19].

On 11 November 1633 Mary Brown, daughter of PETER BROWN, deceased, was placed with “Mr. Joh. Done” for nine years [PCR 1:18]. On 10 October 1644, when Mary Brown had reached seventeen, her portion, which had been in Doane’s hands, was ordered given to John Browne of Duxbury [PCR 2:76].

On 7 June 1636 “John Done, yeoman, entereth an account of slander, & layeth it in an £100, against Helin Billington, widow” [PCR 1:41]; the defendant was fined £5 and ordered “to be set in the stocks & be whipped” [PCR 1:42].

A “John Done,” sixteen years old, sailed from London for New England on the True Love in 1635, and Pope thinks this is the son of the immigrant, but 1635 is very close to the year of birth of the son of the immigrant, so the 1635 passenger must be someone else.

Filed under: Doane/Doan, Family Files, Genealogy, , , , , ,

Deacon John Doane

Deacon John Doane


IN MEMORY OF JOHN DOANE

FOUNDER OF THE DOANE FAMILY IN AMERICA

BORN ABOUT 1590 – DIED FEBRUARY 1 1685

CAME TO PLYMOUTH ABOUT 1630 WHERE HE WAS DEACON OF THE CHURCH; DEPUTY TO THE GENERAL COURT; ONE OF THE ASSISTANTS TO THE GOVERNOR; MEMBER OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVISE THE LAWS IN 1636; ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF EASTHAM IN 1644; DEACON OF THE FIRST CHURCH HERE AND DEPUTY TO THE COURT.

ERECTED BY HIS DESCENDANTS 1907


(plaque in Eastam Town Hall)

MR. JOHN DOANE WHO CAME TO PLYMOUTH ABOUT 1630. HE WAS ONE OF THE LEADERS OF THE COLONY, TWICE ASSISTANT TO THE GOVERNOR, MEMBER OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVISE THE LAWS IN 1636 AND DEACON OF THE CHURCH AT PLYMOUTH. IN 1644 HE REMOVED TO NAUSET AND WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF THE TOWN NOW EASTHAM. HE SERVED THE TOWN AS DEACON OF THE FIRST CHURCH, JUSTICE OF PEACE, MEMBER OF THE FIRST BOARD OF SELECTMEN, DEPUTY TO THE COLONY COURT AND HELD MANY OTHER IMPORTANT PUBLIC OFFICES. A MAN OF WISDOM, INTEGRITY AND DEEP PIETY, HE GAVE HIMSELF UNRESERVEDLY TO THE WELL BEING OF HIS FELLOW MEN AND THE BEST INTERESTS OF THE COMMUNITY. HIS HOUSE STOOD ON THE NORTH SIDE OF TOWN COVE WHERE HE DIED FEBRUARY 21ST 1685 AGED ABOUT NINETY FIVE YEARS. FEW MEN HAVE SERVED THEIR TOWN SO LONG AND FAITHFULLY.

THIS TABLET IS ERECTED TO HIS HONOR BY THE DOANE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA AUGUST 26, 1916

This monument is in position JD on the EHS 1776 Cove survey map. A bronze plaque is attached to a large boulder. The boulder is approximately 52″ W, 52″ H and 22″ D. The gravestone plaque indicates John Doane died February 1, 1685. The Town Hall plaque indicates he died February 21, 1685.

John Doane 1685 – Homesite


1869 Marker

DEA.JOHN DOANE

B. 1590

Here 1644

D. 1685

1869 Marker – back side

DEA John Doane

1644

Erected by Hon. John Doane 1869


1994 Memorial Plaque PLACED BY THE DOANE FAMILY ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA TO COMMEMORATE THE 350TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE PILGRIM SETTLEMENT AT NAUSET IN 1644. IN THAT YEAR SEVEN FAMILIES REMOVED FROM PLIMOUTH PLANTATION TO FORM THE COMMUNITY THAT WAS INCORPORATED AS THE TOWN OF EASTHAM IN 1651.
WE REMEMBER THESE PILGRIM SETTLERS AND THE MANY GENERATIONS OF THEIR DESCENDANTS WHEN WE GATHER HERE.

BANGS COOK DOANE HIGGINS PRENCE SMALLEY SNOW

Doane Rock, on original property in Eastham.


Filed under: Doane/Doan, Family Files, Genealogy, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mignier dit Lagace & Tremblay-Romaine Records

Here are three generations of my ancestor’s records from Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatierre, Eboulements, and La Malbaie.

Marriage of Louis Mignier dit Lagace and Marie-Rosalie Richard, 1775

Marriage of Louis Mignier dit Lagace and Marie Richard 1802

Marriage of Pierre Tremblay (Romaine) and Helene Mignier dit Lagace

Baptism of Pierre Tremblay (Romaine)1798

Baptism of Helene Mignier dit Lagace, 1806

Pierre Tremblay family – Eboulements 1851

Filed under: Family Files, Genealogy, Tremblay, , , , , , , , ,

Francois-Louis Thibault & Elizabeth-Agnes Lefebvre

Francois-Louis Thibault was born June 28, 1647 in Sainte-Catherine-de-la-Flotte, Ile de Re, Aunis, France. He married Elizabeth-Agnes Lefebvre, a fille du roi, on October 14, 1670.

Filed under: Desbiens, Family Files, Genealogy, Tremblay, , , ,

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