Ancestral Notes

My Family History blog

Tombstone Tuesday – Col. John Butler Family Burying Gounds


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Filed under: Brat/Bradt, Daily Genealogy Blogging Themes, Family Files, Genealogy, Loyalists, Tombstone Tuesday, ,

The Last of a Generation

Last night my mother’s sister, Doris Jean Neil Rupert Noland passed away. She was born on September 20, 1929 in Essex County, Ontario, Canada. She was the oldest of eight children, four of whom reached adulthood. She lived in the Essex-Kent area all of her life. She was the mother of six children, four daughters and two sons.


Doris’ family
(one son is absent)

A recent picure of Doris and her daughter.

Filed under: Family Files, Genealogy, O'Neil/Neil, Obituaries, ,

Happy Victoria Day

Victoria Day is a holiday to celebrate Queen Victoria’s birthday. When I was young there was a rhyme about it, ” The 24th of May is the Queen’s birthday, if you don’t give us a holiday we’ll all run away!” So, why is it a week early this year? Why do we even celebrate it at all?
The only thing the kids growing up now know is that it’s the long weekend.

Victoria Day

Queen Victoria (1837-1901)In Canada, the celebration of Victoria Day occurs every year on Monday, prior to May 25th. It is the official celebration in Canada of the birthdays of Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth II. Victoria Day was established as a holiday in Canada West (Now Ontario) in 1845, and became a national holiday in 1901. Before Victoria Day became a national Holiday, people had celebrated Empire Day , beginning in the 1890s as Victoria approached her Diamond jubilee in 1897.
Victoria, queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and empress of India was born on 24 May 1819. She ascended the throne after the death of her uncle George IV in 1837 when she was only 18. She ruled until her death in 1901 when her son Edward the VII became king of England.

Sovereign’s birthday

The Sovereign’s birthday has been celebrated in Canada since the reign of Queen Victoria (1837-1901).
May 24, Queen Victoria’s birthday, was declared a holiday by the Legislature of the Province of Canada in 1845.

After Confederation, the Queen’s birthday was celebrated every year on May 24 unless that date was a Sunday, in which case a proclamation was issued providing for the celebration on May 25.

After the death of Queen Victoria in 1901, an Act was passed by the Parliament of Canada establishing a legal holiday on May 24 in each year (or May 25 if May 24 fell on a Sunday) under the name Victoria Day.

The birthday of King Edward VII, who was born on November 9, was by yearly proclamation during his reign (1901-1910) celebrated on Victoria Day.

Queen Victoria It was not an innovation to celebrate the birthday of the reigning sovereign on the anniversary of the birth of a predecessor. In Great Britain, the birthdays of George IV (1820-1830) and William IV (1830-1837) were celebrated on June 4, birthday of George III (1760-1820).

The birthday of King George V, who reigned from 1910 to 1935, was celebrated on the actual date, June 3 or, when that was a Sunday, by proclamation on June 4.

The one birthday of King Edward VIII, who reigned in 1936, was also celebrated on the actual date, June 23.

King George VI’s birthday, which fell on December 14, was officially celebrated in the United Kingdom on a Thursday early in June. Up to 1947 Canada proclaimed the same day but in 1948 and further years settled on the Monday of the week in which the United Kingdom celebration took place. George VI reigned from 1936 to 1952.

The first birthday of Queen Elizabeth II, in 1952, was also celebrated in June.

Meanwhile, Canada continued to observe Victoria Day. An amendment to the Statutes of Canada in 1952 established the celebration of Victoria Day on the Monday preceding May 25.

From 1953 to 1956, the Queen’s birthday was celebrated in Canada on Victoria Day, by proclamation of the Governor General, with Her Majesty’s approval. In 1957, Victoria Day was permanently appointed as the Queen’s birthday in Canada. In the United Kingdom, the Queen’s birthday is celebrated in June.

from http://www.inglewoodcarecentre.com/history/victoria.htm

Filed under: Special Events,

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – What event or person inspired you to start your genealogy research?

What event or person inspired you to start your genealogy research?

The person who inspired me to start my family history research was my grand-uncle, Fleming Hines. I have written a few posts about him but this blog post is about why he inspired me.

Filed under: Daily Genealogy Blogging Themes, Saturday Night Genealogy Fun,

WWI – CEF-2nd Div. 19th Battalion – Private F.W. Hines

My grand-uncle, Private Fleming Wesley Hines served in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces, 2nd Division, 19th Battalion and died in France on September 18th, 1916. I have been reading the WWI war diaries for the CEF 2nd Division and transcribed some in a previous post. I was hoping to transcribe the diary but it proved far more than I thought at the time, there are up to a hundred pages for just one day when there was a lot of activity. I guess I bit off more than I could chew, lol. So, instead, I’ll read through them and post some of the more interesting pages of the diary as I come across them.

I will be posting the transcribed pages for the time period of different battles from May-Nov. 1916, with an emphasis on the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, as this is probably the battle that my grand-uncle was wounded in, according to the timeline chart below:

Year
Item Date
1914
Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary assassinated in Sarajevo 28 June, 1914
1914
Germany declares war on Russia 1 August, 1914
1914
Germany declares war on France 3 August, 1914
1914
Germany invades Belgium, establishing the Western Front war, Britain declares war 4 August, 1914
1914
Canada commits 25,000 troops to support England. 5 August, 1914
1914
US declares itself neutral 8 August, 1914
1914
Germans and British troops engage for the first time at Mons. British slow the German advance 23 – 24 August, 1914
1914
Trenches first dug on the Western Front 15 September, 1914
1914
First Canadian Troops arrive in Britain 14 October, 1914
1914
Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry is assigned to the British 80th Brigade and become the first Canadians in France. 21 October, 1914
1914
Troops share an unofficial Christmas Truce in the Western Front trenches. 25 December, 1914
1915
First German Zeppelin raid on British mainland. 19 January, 1915
1915
First use of poison gas in WW1, by Germany at Bolimow in Poland on the Eastern Front 31 January, 1915
1915
the 1st Canadian Division arrives in France 16 February, 1915
1915
Battle of Neuve Chapelle 10 March, 1915
1915
Action of St. Eloi 14-15 March, 1915
1915
Gravenstafel Ridge – Poison Gas is first used on the Western Front, in a German attack on French and Canadian troops on the Ypres Salient. Part of 2nd Ypres. 22-23 April, 1915
1915
St. Julien. Part of 2nd Ypres. 24 April – 4 May, 1915
1915
Lusitania is sunk by a German submarine; casualties include 124 Americans passengers. 7 May, 1915
1915
Frezenberg Ridge. Part of 2nd Ypres. 8-13 May, 1915
1915
Battle of Aubers Ridge 9 May, 1915
1915
Battle of Festubert 17-25 May, 1915
1915
Bellewaerde Ridge. Part of 2nd Ypres. 24-25 May, 1915
1915
Second Action of Givenchy 15-16 June, 1915
1915
The Battle of Loos 25-September- 8 October, 1915
1915
Action of Bois Grenier (part of the Battle of Loos) 25 September, 1915
1915
Actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt 13-19 October, 1915
1916
Action of St Eloi Craters 27 March – 16 April 1916
1916
Battle of Mount Sorrel 2 – 13 June 1916
1916
Albert (Capture of Montauban, Mametz, Fricourt, Contalmaison and la Boisselle) 1-13 July, 1916
1916
Bazentin Ridge 14-17 July, 1916
1916
Attack at Fromelles 19 July, 1916
1916
Attacks on High Wood 20-25 July, 1916
1916
Pozieres Ridge (Fighting for Mouquet Farm) 1-3 September, 1916
1916
Guillemont 3-6 Setember, 1916
1916
Ginchy 9 September, 1916
1916
Flers-Courcelette 15-22 September, 1916
1916
Thiepval Ridge 26-29 September, 1916
1916
Le Transloy Ridges (Capture of Eaucourt l’Abbaye) 1-18 October, 1916
1916
Ancre Heights (Capture of Regina Trench) 1 October – 11 November, 1916
1916
The Ancre (Capture of Beaumont Hamel) 15-18 November, 1916
1917
German retreat to the Hindenburg Line 24-29 March, 1917
1917
The US declares war on Germany. 6 April, 1917
1917
Battle of Vimy Ridge 9 – 14 April 1917
1917
First Scarpe 9 – 14 April 1917
1917
Second Scarpe 23-24 April, 1917
1917
Attack on la Coulotte 23 April, 1917
1917
Arleux 28-29 April
1917
Third Scarpe (Capture of Fresnoy) 3-4 May, 1917
1917
First US troops arrive in France. 26 May, 1917
1917
Affairs south of the Souchez River 3-25 June, 1917
1917
General Sir Arthur Currie appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Canadian Corps. Currie became the first Canadian to hold overall command of Canadian troops. He was appointed over other British Generals who had higher rank/more seniority. Currie had his detractors but was the greatest Canadian General and to some the greatest military leader of all time. 8 June, 1917
1917
Capture of Avoin 26-29 June, 1917
1917
Battle of Messines (Capture of Wytschaete) 7-14 June
1917
Pilckem Ridge 31-July-2 August, 1917
1917
Battle of Hill 70 15 – 25 August, 1917
1917
Langemarck 16-18 August, 1917
1917
Menin Road Ridge 20-25 September, 1917
1917
Polygon Wood 26 September – 3 October , 1917
1917
Broodseinde 4 October, 1917
1917
Poelcappelle 9 October, 1917
1917
First Passchendaele 12 October, 1917
1917
Second Passenchdaele 26 October – 10 November 1917
1917
Battle of Cambrai – Tank attacks 20-21 November, 1918
1917
Battle of Cambrai – Capture of Bourlon Wood 23-28 November, 1918
1917
Russia and Germany sign an armistice at Brest-Litovsk, effectively ending the two-front war and allowing Germany to concentrate troops on the Western Front 15 December, 1917
1918
US forces make their first offensive 28 May, 1918
1918
St. Quentin 21-23 March, 1918
1918
Actions at the Somme Crossings 24-25 March, 1918
1918
First Bapaume 24-25 March, 1918
1918
Rosieres 26-27 March, 1918
1918
First Arras 28 March, 1918
1918
Moreuil Wood 30 March, 1918
1918
Avre 4 April, 1918
1918
Estaires (First Defence of Givenchy, 1918). Part of the battle of the Lys. 9-11 April, 1918
1918
Messines (Loss of Hill 63). Part of the battle of the Lys. 10-11 April 1918
1918
Hazebrouck. Part of the battle of the Lys. 12-15 April, 1918
1918
Bailleul (Defence of Neuve Eglise). Part of the battle of the Lys. 13-15 April, 1918
1918
First Kemmel Ridge . Part of the battle of the Lys. 17-19 April, 1918
1918
US forces make their first offensive 28 May, 1918
1918
Canadian Hospital ship Llandovery Castle sunk by German U-Boat. Life boats were pursued and sunk. 234 were killed, including 14 nursing sisters. 24 survived. This attack proved a rallying cry for the Canadian troops for the rest of the war. 27 June, 1918
1918
Action of La Becque 28 June, 1918
1918
Capture of Hamel 4 July, 1918
1918
Battle of Amiens (code named “Llandovery Castle”). On 8 August, ‘the Black Day of the German Army’ – Canadian and Australian troops, plus 600 tanks, shatter German forces and reach Hindenburg line. 8 – 11 August 1918
1918
Actions around Damery 15-17 August, 1918
1918
Albert (1st Pioneer Battalion on detached duty) 21-23 August, 1918
1918
Second Bapaume 31 August-3 September, 1918
1918
2nd Battle of Arras 26 August – 3 September 1918
1918
Scarpe (Capture of Monchy-le-Preux). Part of the 2nd Battle of Arras. 26-30 August, 1918
1918
Drocourt-Queant Canal 2-3 september, 1918
1918
Havrincourt 12 September, 1918
1918
Epehy 18 September, 1918
1918
Canal du Nord (Capture of Bourlon Wood) 27 September – 1 October, 1918
1918
St. Quentin Canal 29 September – 2 October, 1918
1918
Beaurevoir Line 3-5 October, 1918
1918
Cambrai (Capture of Cambrai) 8-9 October, 1918
1918
Battle of Ypres 28 September-2 October, 1918
1918
Pursuit to the Selle 9-12 October, 1918
1918
Battle of Courtrai 14-19 October, 1918
1918
Battle of the Selle 17-25 October. 1918
1918
Battle of Valenciennes (Capture of Mont Houy) 1-2 November, 1918
1918
Battle of the Sambre 4 November, 1918
1918
Passage of the Grande Honnelle 5-7 November
1918
Capture of Mons 9-11 November 1918
1918
Armistice 11 November, 1918
1919
Kinmel Park Mutiny. Canadian troops mutiny because of delays in returning to Canada. 4-5 March, 1919
1919
End of the war/Treaty of Versailles 28 June, 1919

Primary source: Nicholson, G. W. L. 1962. Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War: Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1919.

Canadian Great War Project

Filed under: Doane/Doan, Family Files, Genealogy, Haines/Hines, , ,

Friendly Blogger Award

 

Gini at Ginisology has chosen my blog for the “Friendly Blogger Award”. Thanks, Gini. Now, I am going to pass the award along to seven more bloggers.

1. Genea-musings by Randy Seaver
2. A Candian Family by Evelyn

4. Southern Extended Families by Landry Landry
5. Genblog by Julie
6. Find Your Folks by Drusilla 
7. Please don’t eat sushi! Love, Mom by Adam

Filed under: Blogging, Kudos,

Curious Fox Message Boards

One of the most useful tools I have found for contacting family members doing genealogy research are message boards and forums. I have made the majority of my family connections by posting brickwalls and queries to message boards. Patience is mandatory for this though, most of the time there may not be a response for months, even years after posting messages. There are the popular message boards on Ancestry.com, Rootsweb, Genealogy.com etc. Most genealogy sites have some form of message board or forum.
I discovered a new site solely intended for posing messages and queries, Curious Fox. Well I discovered it last year, but it was in Beta. Now, it’s out of Beta and up and running. You can search a place name or surname in any of the United States, but they also have links to their message board sites for the United Kingdom and Ireland at the bottom of the page. I think this will be a very popular site in the future.

Filed under: Daily Genealogy Blogging Themes, Follow Friday, Research Resources,

Do You Have A Genealogical Will?

Most family historians make out a will when they have any family heirlooms, property or possessions of value and never give a thought to what will become of all of their hard work. What will happen to your genealogy research when you’re gone? Have you thought about who will be inheriting it? Will it be a family member? A library? A Family society? A historical society?
If you are fortunate enough to have a younger family member who is interested in genealogy, you can keep it in the family, but you may not have anyone in the family who shares your interests and appreciates the thousands of hours of time and all the work spent on researching your family.You may decide to leave it to someone other than family so that it isn’t sitting gathering dust in an attic or worse yet, getting tossed in the trash by family members while doing spring cleaning. If you don’t have a family member interested in continuing what you started, you would be better off leaving it to your local library or family organization or a historical society. Find someone willing to take the donation.
It doesn’t have to be a notarized document, just a letter stating what your wishes are regarding your research. Let your family know your wishes beforehand, make a copy to give to the heir of your choice, and store the letter with your will.
By making your wishes known, you don’t have to worry about all of your genealogy research going to the landfill when you’re gone and future generations will be able to pick up where you left off.

Filed under: Genealogy,

Happy Mother’s Day!

This is my first Mother’s Day that I am celebrating without a visit with my mother. I can still remember the first store-bought Mother’s Day Gift we gave our Mom. Dad gave us some money to go uptown and buy her a gift. “Uptown” consisted of a hardware store, a grocery store, and a convenience store, so we searched and finally came home with what we thought was the best choice for Mom. It was a small ceramic figurine of a skunk with real fur on the tail. When she looked at it she would always remember the spring that she got sprayed by a skunk! She loved it and thought it was the perfect gift.

the cake my grandchildren baked for their
mom and me yesterday

My mother-in-law is a special person as well, after my mom passed away last summer she had a memorial stone made for me with mom’s poem on it.


Filed under: Genealogy, Special Events,

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – You might be a professional genealogist if…

Randy Seaver’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – You might be a professional genealogist if…
Here are my additions to the list :

1. you make out a genealogical will
2. you have the local historical society on speed dial
3.your idea of a vacation includes stops to at least three pioneer cemeteries
4. you stop to ask for directions to abandoned cemeteries and the locals don’t know they exist
5. you are listening to neighbourhood gossip and hear yourself say “cite your sources”
6. you are at an antique auction and find old photo albums, and you start flipping through them looking for names and dates (did that yesterday).

Filed under: Daily Genealogy Blogging Themes, Saturday Night Genealogy Fun,

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