Ancestral Notes

My Family History blog

Surname Saturday – Desbiens

I am searching for any of my grandmother’s sibling’s family. My grandmother, Josephine, was born in Essex County in 1897. Her family was from the Charlevoix Quebec area and came to Essex County, Ontario about 1890. John Desbiens and Celina Tremblay had a large family but I don’t know much about them other than what I have from obituaries. As far as I know, three of her oldest siblings were born in Quebec, the rest were born in Essex County.

John and Celina Tremblay Desbiens’ family:

Marie Louise, born 1884, died before 1891 census
Joseph, born 1885, married Aurize Laliberte in Belle River on Oct. 15, 1912, she died a year later during choldbirth
Emile,born 1890
Louis Thomas
Medard married Marie Girard in Bele River on Oct. 20, 1914
Eugene, born 1893
Delia, born 1893
Adelina Debrah
Ercules
Josephine, born 1897, married Wm.E. Hines, Oct. 6,1917
Celina married Walter Randall in Belle River on Jan.16, 1912
John J.,born 1901
Eva, born 1905

If you are researching these families or have any information about them, please leave a message or contact me.

Filed under: Desbiens, Surname Saturday

Surname Saturday – Brat, Bradt

My husband is descended from the Albany family of Bradts, from Albert “the
Norman” Brat, his brother founded the Schenectady family. I started a new
database for my husband’s family. I’ve been gathering Dutch Reformed Church
records from Albany before the Rev. War. They spelled the surname Brat in the
records. I was looking for John Bradt who was married to Susan Seger, I found
him, Jan Brat, married to Zantje Zeger.

I found the baptismal records for their
son, Myndert (Minor) in 1760, born in 1758, married to Catherine Van Alstine, but didn’t
find any marriage records for him there, he must have been married in Upper
Canada ( my 2nd great-aunt was Catherine Haines, married Daniel Van Alstine,
maybe she widowed young and was the Catherine I’m looking for, wouldn’t that be
a hoot?). Not much hope of finding the record here, there were no churches here
(Ontario) until 1792. Maybe I can find a baptismal record from St. Mark’s Church
in Niagara for his children.

His son, William, married to Elizabeth Austin, born
in Albany, NY is who my husband descends from. Their son, George married
Catherine Hoover and moved to Pelee Island after her death, and he’s buried on the
island.

Charles Bradt was born in Cayuga Twp., Haldimand county in 1881 and moved to Pelee Island with his father and brothers. He was married to Alzina Lee and resided on Pelee Island.

Filed under: Brat/Bradt, Daily Genealogy Blogging Themes, Family Files, Genealogy, Surname Saturday, ,

Wordless Wednesday – Charles Bradt

In an earlier post, I identified this photo as Charles Phipps on Pelee Island, but the correct identity is Charles Bradt on Phipp’s farm on Pelee Island.

Filed under: Brat/Bradt, Genealogy, , , ,

Surname Saturday – Tremblay

I chose to explore the “Tremblay” surname today, my great-grandmother’s maiden name. I have posted about Pierre Tremblay and Ozanne Achon, who were my immigrant ancestors. Tremblay and it’s variations is the most common French-Canadian surname, put it into Google translate and it comes back with “Smith”, the most common name in North America! The difference between “Smith” and “Tremblay” is that Smith is a common name that a lot of different families share, with no blood relationship, there was a smith in every village and hamlet in Europe, it was a “nickname”. But people with the name of Tremblay, Trombley, Trimble and variations in North America, ” in their tree, although a common name, are all cousins, descendants of Pierre du Tremble, from La Rochelle, France.

My great-grandmother, Celinase Tremblay was the granddaughter of Pierre Tremblay Romain, the Seignieur of Eboullements, Quebec in the early 1800’s. She was born at Charlevois and was married to Jean Desbiens of Ste-Jerome parish. They migrated to Essex County in 1890, after the birth of their third child with Celina’s parents, Philias Tremblay and Marie-Louise Dallaire, Extended family made the journey as well, but her father died less than a year after arriving, 1n 1891.

Here is my great-grandmother’s family:


As you can see, she had a large family. I found a few newspaper clippings in the Essex Free Press Archives at OurOntario as well:


I have a lot of research yet to do on this family. I found a few records on the Seeking Michigan website for the families that moved across the river. I have to find time to enter all of the sources and images that I’ve discovered into my database, but there’s a lot of searching left to do.

Here is Celina Tremblay Desbien’s pedigree chart:

Filed under: Daily Genealogy Blogging Themes, Family Files, Genealogy, Surname Saturday, Tremblay, , , ,

Tombstone Tuesday – Memorial Marker Mistakes


This is a perfect example of misinformation on gravestones. It is a Memorial to Fleming Wesley Hines, born 1897 – died 1916. At least they got the country that he died in right.

Filed under: Daily Genealogy Blogging Themes, Family Files, Genealogy, Haines/Hines, Photos, Tombstone Tuesday, , ,

Remembrance Day – “Yield Not To Difficulties”

I was going to write a memorial post about my Grand-uncle, Stanley Fairbairn, but I didn’t know much about him, my mother hadn’t seen him since he left Essex County. I didn’t think it would do him justice, so I asked his daughter, Judy, if she would like to write something about him so this is her Remembrance Day post:



My Father Stanley Gerald Fairbairn was in WW11. He enlisted in the Canada’s Armed Forces 27 Jul 1940 at North Bay, Ontario, Canada. Stanley’s army number was #B.54545. He was sent to Shiloh, Manitoba, Canada to do training. He was in the Military Police promoted to LP Captain. He was trained for mechanics of trucks and war machinery and had his Class 111 Track and Class 111 Wheel. Father was transferred to Balwood,Newfoundland 19 Oct 1942 for hernia surgery.


He left Canada 9 May 1944 from Debert, Nova Scotia belonging to the Algonquin Regiment and had reverted to private at his own request to go overseas.

After disembarking in England by ship, he was merged to the Scottish Essex Regiment 15 Aug 1944. The D-Day invasion 6 June 1944 on the shores of France left almost every man dead. My Father was in the second wave shipped to France by boat 17 Jul 1944. The assignment was to try to fight their way inland. On 26 Aug 1944 at Elobef, France tanks were crossing a clearing when the Nazi’s started firing at the tanks. My father managed to get out of the tank along with a buddy, they ran for a trench and dove in . Exploding mortar fragments hit the back of the trench killing Father’s friend and leaving Father in very serious condition.

He had a penetrating wound in left chest with shrapnel, part of his left hand was missing fingers, his arms were mangled , his face was cut, his lips were shredded and shrapnel had went into the left side of his neck. He was rescued and flown back to England. There were no drugs to ease the pain on that flight, my father was conscious the whole time, not expected to live.


In England he was listed with the Black Watch. at Leavesden Military Hospital on 26 Aug 1944, amputations of both arms: the left arm below the elbow and his right hand. He ran raging temperatures. They sent cables home to Canada, notices of serious wounds.

Black Watch # 54545 PTE Fairbairn Stanley Gerald,
diagnosis..DANGEROUS 27 Aug 44, Cable No. to Ottawa 341A, sent 6 Sep 1944.

Gas gangrene set in, they sent my Father back to surgery 21 Sep 1944, this time they amputated the left arm just below the shoulder leaving a small stump.

Note on 1 Oct 1944 right stump … graft did not take; 12 Oct 1944 the right arm was amputated just below the elbow bend. His temperature raged. The English Hospital discharged him 5 Nov 1944, “fit to travel” home to Canada by ship. 25 Nov 1944 on Voyage 1 from Liverpool to disembarking at Hailfax, Canada on 11 Dec 1944.The whole crossing he had raging temperatures.from Essex Free Press, Essex, ON

The Department of Veteran’s Affairs sent him by train to Toronto to recuperate. The war wives were told to not be shocked by what they would see. How could they not be shocked? They sent healthy husbands off to war and mangled men came back. The official date of discharge from
the army was 17 Feb 1945. Stanley was 29 years old 4 months.

My Father was fitted with a hook on his right arm and had to learn to use it instead of a hand. Father learned to feed himself, drive a car and a boat and to write all using a hook. Stanley took great pleasure in fishing and hunting and raised his four children to enjoy country life.

It took great strength of character to learn to live his new life. Father never talked about the war, I learned about the double amputations of both arms after his death. This Remembrance Day 2009 I will share my Father’s wisdom with you. He said remember you are a Fairbairn …

“Yield Not To Difficulties”


On this Remembrance Day I challenge every family member to do something worth writing about to make this family proud. May my words help you to understand the price our family paid for freedom.

Author: Judith Lynn Fairbairn-McGinnis
LEST WE FORGET
Dedicated to the Memory of Stanley Gerald Fairbairn

Name: Stanley Gerald Fairbairn
Birth: 7 Oct 1915
Birth Place: Essex,Ontario, Canada
Death: 27 Nov 1984
Place: Sudbury,Ontario,Canada
Burial: Park Lawn Cemetery
Tier 1A,Veterans
Place: Sudbury, Ontario,Canada

Filed under: Fairbairn, Family Files, Genealogy, Photos, Special Events, , , ,

A Wedding To Remember

My niece was married on Halloween with, you guessed it, a Halloween theme. She and her new husband have two daughters together, 16 and 13.

the blushing (or shall I say paling) bride
She’s making her Grand Entrance…

the Groom

the Family

Filed under: Family Files, Genealogy, Haines/Hines, Special Events,

Follow Friday – Cape Cod Gravestones

If you’re ancestors were first families in and around Plymouth Colony, chances are that you will find their names on 17th, 18th & 19th Century Cape Cod Gravestones. There is an index to all of the cemeteries in Cape Cod, and if you are lucky, there may be a photo of the markers. I found quite a few photos of ancestors graves, here are some examples:


Ebenezer Nickerson 1768

Joshua Doane
1716

From the website:

Mission Statement


A major goal is to photograph and display the most interesting old gravestones in Barnstable County before they are lost to the ravages of time. A related goal is to provide reasonably complete gravestone records from the earliest in 1683 up to 1880 or later for all Barnstable County cemeteries. Information about the gravestone carvers and gravestone styles is included. Reference sources for cemetery surveys done over the last one hundred years are provided for further research.

Search Suggestion


If you want to search for a specific name on this large web site, go to the Google search engine at http://www.google.com. In the search box enter capecodgravestones+name. There should be no space before or after the + sign. For example, if you are searching for Marcy Freeman, enter in the search box capecodgravestones+Marcy+Freeman. The search result will be a listing of links to Marcy Freeman. To search for all the Mulfords, enter capecodgravestones+Mulford in the Google search box. Click on the link “Repeat the search with the omitted results included” to display all the links. Most links go directly to sections of this web site but some links go to other web sites which link back to this web site. In limited tests this search procedure works well with Google! The procedure does not work with some other search engines.

Filed under: Daily Genealogy Blogging Themes, Doane/Doan, Family Files, Follow Friday, Genealogy, Photos, Research Resources, ,

Treasure Thursday – Doane Collection


I found this book at a yard sale, “Searching For Your Ancestors” written by Gilbert H. Doane. There is a lot of great information in it for amateur genealogists about how to research your family, where to look, what to look for, etc. It is the third edition printed in 1960. The first edition was printed in 1937. If anyone knows of a first edition available, I’m interested in getting a copy.
As for the Doan’s Pills tin, I bought it from eBay a few years ago for a couple of dollars. James Doan invented the pills while working as a druggist in Kingsville, Ontario.

Filed under: Daily Genealogy Blogging Themes, Doane/Doan, Family Files, Genealogy, Photos, Treasure Chest Thursday, , , ,

Surname Saturday – Small, Smalle, Smalley

I have recently found another family that I am descended from, the Smalley family from Harwich, Massechusetts. I am just starting to research this family but I’ve heard the name when reading about Plymouth Colony. I haven’t gone that far back in my research as of yet, I’ve gone back to Edward Smalle and Mary Woodward, grandparents of Hannah Smalley who married Benjamin Doane on Jan. 29, 1795 in Harwich, MA.

What I have found about the Smalley family:

EDWARD SMALLE married MARY WOODMAN and had the following children:
i. JOHNATHON SMALLEY, born in 1690, married Damaris Winslow July 30, 1713. 

Damaris & Jonathan were the parents of five children: i. HANNAH SMALL, born 20 August 1715 in Harwich (Barnstable) Massachusetts. She married Israel Nickerson. Hannah & Israel were the parents of five children: (a) an unnamed daughter; (b) an unnamed son; (c) Israel Nickerson; (d) James Nickerson; and (e) Patience Nickerson. ii. PHEBE SMALLEY (985) iii. JONATHAN SMALLEY, born 26 May 1721. He married 2 March 1741/42, Hannah Weekes, who was born 21 September 1721 and died about 1803, daughter of George and Deborah (Wing) Weekes. Jonathan & Hannah were the parents of seven children: (a) Elijah Smalley; (b) David Smalley; (c) Jonathan Smalley, married Bethia Godfrey; (d) Phebe Smalley; (e) Enoch Smalley; (f) Elisha Smalley; and (g) Hannah Smalley. iv. LYDIA SMALL, born 6 August 1725 in Harwich. She married Ebenezer Broadbrooks. v. DAVID SMALL, born 1729.

 

ii. LT. ZACHARIAH SMALLEY, born 1698, died 24 April 1778 in Harwich (Barnstable) Massachusetts. He married (as his first wife) 31 March 1720 in Oyster River (Durham) New Hampshire, Jane Davis. Zachariah & Jane were the parents of three daughters: (a) Mary Smalley, married Oker/Oaker Phillips, five children, Lydia, Nathan, Stephen, Susannah and Smalley; (b) Bathsheba/Bashua Smalley, married first Ansel Nickerson, married second, Gowel Chase, married third, Joseph Sears; and (c) Abigail Small, married Lot Gage. Zachariah married (as his second wife and as her second husband) after 22 May 1742 in Harwich, Hannah (Hopkins) Paine, who was born 25 March 1700 in Eastham (Barnstable) Massachusetts, and died 24 October 1793 in Harwich, daughter of Joshua and Mary (Cole) Hopkins, and widow of Capt. Ebenezer Paine. Zachariah & Hannah were the parents of a daughter: (d) Jane Small, married John Long, six children, Zachariah/Zachery, Abigail/Abijah, Ebenezer, John, Sarah and Jane.

iii. BENJAMIN sMALLEY married 29 June 1726, Patience Baker, who was born 27 February 1708/09.Patience was a midwife. She died of a broken neck when she fell off her horse while on her way to assist in the delivery of a baby.

Benjamin & Patience were the parents of seven children: i. BENJAMIN SMALL. He married Bridget Eldridge. Benjamin & Bridget were the parents of ten children: (a) Dorcas Small, married Samuel Eldridge, two children, Samuel and Priscilla; (b) Sarah Smalley, married Ebenezer Eldridge, two sons, Ebenezer and Jacob; (c) Patience Small, married Uriah Nickerson, nine children, Joshua, Tabatha, Patience, Rosanna, Uriah, Malachi, Lurana, Israel and Ruth; (d) William Small, married Sally Doggat; (e) Benjamin Small, married Susanna Lovell, eight children, Denna/Denny, Thomas, Lovell, Benjamin, Lukey, Polly, Abner and Zebina; (f) James Small, married Anna Eldridge/Nickerson, thirteen children, Nathan, Polly, Anna, Bridget, Cynthia, James, Dorcas, Rua/Rebecca, Naomi, Samuel, Samuel, Diadama and Damaris; (g) Eli Small, married Elizabeth Rodgers, nine children, Betsey, Eldridge, Sarah, Eli, Moses, Aaron, Elizabeth, Eli and Polina; (h) Thomas Small, married Lydia Robbins, nine children, Mehetabel, Obed, Reliance, Lydia, Thomas, Nathaniel, Patience, Benjamin and Hannah; (i) Briget Small, married Jeremiah Ellis; and (j) Zebidu Small, married Mercy Eldridge. ii. EDWARD SMALL. He married 24 September 1761, Hannah Cole. Edward & Hannah were the parents of ten children: (a) Daniel Small, married Priscilla Clark, seven children, Paddock, Daniel, Prissilla, Josiah, Sophia, Nathan and Hannah; (b) Edward Small, married Lydia Phillips, eleven children, Nabby, Sally, Freeman, Arena, Anthony, Lydia, Orin, Melinda, Huldah, Patience and Edward; (c) Thankful Smalley, married Isaac Paine; (d) Abigail Small; (e) Isaiah Smalley, married Deborah Weekes; (f) Isaac Small; (g) Reuben Small, married first, Betsey Phillips, married second, Thankful Cahoon; (h) Hannah Small, married Benjamin Doane; (i) Patience Small, married (—) Seabat; and (j) Ezra Small, married Barbara Young. iii. JOHN SMALL. He married his second cousin, twice removed, Abigail Gage, daughter of [990] James and Mercy (Baker) Gage. iv. JOSEPH SMALL. He married 28 December 1765, Mercy Godfry. v. MARY SMALL. She married William Eldredge. Mary & William were the parents of a son: (a) Daniel Eldredge, married Edith Bassett. vi. PATIENCE SMALL. She married John Cahoon. vii. MERCY SMALL

According to DNA test results, Edward Smalle was not related to John Smalley of Plymouth Colony and Nauset, Massechusetts.

 SOURCES:
John D. Austin, FASG, Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume 6, Second Edition, Family Stephen Hopkins, (Plymouth, Massachusetts: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1995), 32, 45, 126

“Freeman Compilation,” MS, c. 1875; Harwich, Massachusetts, 281

 

Filed under: Daily Genealogy Blogging Themes, Doane/Doan, Family Files, Genealogy, Surname Saturday, , , , , , ,

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