Ancestral Notes

My Family History blog

Tidbits Gleaned From Small-Town Newspapers

I thought maybe I’d find some family births, marriages and obits when I started searching the old newspapers, but that is just the tip of the iceberg. The Essex Free Press is a small-town weekly newspaper filled with all of the news from the county. If you want to find out who bought what farm for how much and where the previous owners were relocated to, you read the Essex Free Press. When the December exams and June report cards came out, the students’ grades were published in the paper. There was nothing that wasn’t newsworthy, so and so had a cold, stop the presses!

My family has been in Essex County for over a hundred years and some were involved in local government. I was surprised to find so many references to my ancestors and their daily lives.
I discovered that my greatgrandfather’s family moved to Alberta in the spring of 1918 because of my greatgrandfather’s health. He had suffered from gall stones for years and at that time, Alberta was the place to go for health problems. Maybe it was the mountain air, or the warm spring water in Banff, but, for whatever reason, they went there. They returned in October, with no improvement to his health. He passed away in December of 1918, when my grandmother was six years old.

Another article gave me a lot of information about my grandmother’s family, my dad didn’t have much information about them to share as he would just sit on the front porch while my grandmother visited because he didn’t understand French and their family just came to Ontario from Quebec in 1890.

My granduncle was the first casualty of the First WW in the town of Essex:

There is over a century of my family’s history here, some amusing, some embarrassing, some tragic, but all in all, I’d rather read a small-town newspaper and learn alot more about the people than a big-city paper that doesn’t have the time or space for all of the everyday events that occur in a small-town.

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Filed under: Genealogy, Obituaries, Research Resources, , ,

Is Your Birth Date Genetic?

The date of your birth should be totally random, but is it? How many people in your family share a birthday with another family member?

I was asking myself this question today, since March 22 is my niece’s 20th birthday, my nephew’s 14th birthday and my grandnephew’s 8th birthday.

I started thinking about the date, the 22nd of the month. I found this to be a popular day to give birth in my family. My older brother was born on September 22nd, my son was born on January 22nd and my grandnephew’s first birthday was February 22nd. That’s six family members born on the 22nd of the month, half in the same month. There were a lot of close calls too. My granddaughter, nephew and niece were born on the 19th, one niece, one nephew, one grandnephew on the 21st. That’s 12 out of 40 family members that were born between the 19th – 22nd of the month. I think that’s more than coincidence!

Quite a few of my family members share birthdays also, my oldest son and my niece , my nephew and grandson, my nephew and my dad, my grandson and my grandmother, my grandfather and me.

My brothers and sisters and I have a theory about all of the September births among us, first three of seven, the seventh one was late, October 4th. Our theory is that it’s nine months after Christmas, and when they were first starting out they didn’t have much to spend on gifts for each other, and the last one was because they had six mouths to feed and didn’t have much money to spent on gifts for each other.

Filed under: Genealogy, ,

We Met For The First Time …… Again

My husband in front of Butler’s Barracks,
Niagara-on-the-lake, Ontario

I met my husband for the first time in April of 1998, but something about him seemed so familiar, like we’ve known each other all our lives. As I started researching my family history, I researched his family, the Bradts. I discovered that several of his ancestors were Loyalists, and they served in John Butler’s Corp of Rangers. As a matter of fact, John Butler was married to Catherine Bradt.

I soon was reading all about the Butler’s Rangers and even bought a few books so that I could learn more about them, Ontario People 1796-1803 transcribed and annotated by E. Keith Fitzgerald, Butler’s Rangers, The Revolutionary Period by E. Cruikshank, and a few months ago, An Annotated Nominal Roll of the Butler’s Rangers 1777 – 1784 With Documentary Sources compiled and arranged by Lt.-Col. William A. Smy, OMM, CD, UE.

I learned a lot about where his family came from and where they ended up. Before the Revolutionary war, they lived in Tryon County, New York in the Mohawk Valley. They joined Butler’s Rangers and after the war, they were granted land in the Home District (Niagara region).

When I started reading my latest book, I discovered that my loyalist Haines ancestors came from the Mohawk Valley before the war. They came from Germany about 1760, in all likelyhood, at the request of Sir William Johnson, who wanted to create a town by inviting Scottish and German families to immigrate and lease land from him. According to the book, Joseph Haines, Sr. leased 100 acres from Sir Wiliam Johnson, and raised his family of seven there until the revolutionary war broke out. He and his sons served in the Butler’s Rangers, alongside the Bradts. They went to Lachine, Quebec with the Rangers at the end of the war and were granted land in the Home District.

My great-grandfather was born and raised in Niagara Twp., and moved to Elgin County in the 1880’s and to Essex County in the 1890’s. My husband’s family came from the Niagara area to Haldimand County in the 1870’s and then to Essex County in the 1890’s.

So, it seems like our ancestors were neighbours and possibly friends, so I like to think that it was with some help from both fo our ancestors that we met, and now, five generations later, the Bradt and Haines families are reunited.

Filed under: Brat/Bradt, Family Files, Genealogy, Haines/Hines, Loyalists, , , , , , , ,

Deacon John Doane – Plymouth Colony Records

JOHN DOANE

ORIGIN: England
MIGRATION: 1630
FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth
REMOVES: Eastham 1645
OCCUPATION: Yeoman, innkeeper. (On 4 June 1639 “Mr. John Done is allowed to draw wine until the next Court, that further order may be taken therein” [ PCR 1:127]; on 2 June 1640 “we present Mr. Done for selling wine contrary to order made by the Court. It was mistaken by the grand inquest, and so he was discharged by the Court the 3d September 1640, and appointed by the Court to be thus erased out” [PCR 1:156]. On 7 January 1644/5, Doane agreed to let James Cole “take off those wines he now hath in his hands” [PCR 2:79-80]).
CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: 2 January 1633/4: “Mr. John Done, being formerly chosen to the office of a deacon in the church, at the request of the church & himself was freed from the office of an Assistant in the commonwealth” [PCR 1:23].
On 18 April 1642, John Done, agent for the church of Plymouth, purchased from Mr. Ralph Smith a house, buildings, and garden plots in Plymouth, also six acres of upland in the new field [PCR 12:79-80]. The same year, Doane turned this property over to “Mr. John Reynor their teacher” [PCR 12:87].
FREEMAN: In “1633” Plymouth list of freemen, ahead of those made free 1 January 1632/3 [PCR 1:3]; in lists of 7 March 1636/7 [PCR 1:52]; in Plymouth section of Plymouth colony list of 1639 (as “Mr. John Done”), from which he was erased and reentered in the Eastham section of the same list [PCR 8:173, 177]; in Eastham section of lists of 1658, 29 May 1670 and 1 [blank] 1683/4 [PCR 5:278, 8:201, 208].
EDUCATION: Appointment to committee to revise laws indicates considerable education.
OFFICES: Plymouth Colony Council, 1 January 1632/3 [PCR 1:5]. Committee to divide meadow ground, 1 July 1633, 2 October 1637 [PCR 1:14, 67]. Committee to assess taxes, 2 January 1633/4, 2 March 1635/6 [PCR 1:26, 38]. Committee to collect money for building a mill, 5 July 1635 [PCR 1:35]. Committee to regulate prices and wages, 5 January 1635/6 [PCR 1:36]. Committee to revise laws, 4 October 1636, 6 May 1639 [PCR 1:44, 121]. Committee on trade with the Indians, 7 March 1636/7 [PCR 1:54]. Committee to lay out highways, 2 May 1637, 1 February 1640/1 [PCR 1:58, 2:7]. Committee on beaver trade, 7 June 1637 [PCR 1:62]. Coroner’s jury, 5 June 1638 [PCR 1:88].

Plymouth deputy to General Court, 4 June 1639, 7 June 1642, 27 September 1642, 6 June 1643, 29 August 1643, 10 October 1643, 5 March 1643/4, 5 June 1644 (but did not attend) [PCR 1:126, 2:40, 45, 57, 59, 60, 63, 68, 72]. Deputy for Nawset, 6 June 1649, 4 June 1650 [PCR 2:144, 154]. Deputy for Eastham, 5 June 1651, 6 April 1653, 7 June 1653, 7 June 1659 [PCR 2:168, 3:24, 32, 162]. Auditor, 7 September 1641, 3 March 1644/5 [PCR 2:24, 82]. Grand jury, 2 June 1640, 2 March 1640/1 [PCR 1:155, 2:11]. Petit jury, 7 March 1636/7, 2 October 1637, 2 January 1637/8, 6 March 1637/8, 4 September 1638, 3 March 1639/40, 5 October 1640, 6 September 1641, 7 December 1641, 3 Mary 1642, 1 November 1642, 5 November 1644, 3 March 1644/5, 1 March 1652/3, 2 October 1660 [PCR 3:200, 7:5, 7-9, 16, 17, 23, 25, 28, 29, 32, 38, 40, 64].

On 24 January 1641/2, “Mr. John Done” was one of four men elected to head committees to supply six muskets with shot, powder, and swords every Lord’s day “ready for service if need require” [PCR 2:31].

On 1 June 1663 the court appointed Mr. John Doane to “administer marriage in Eastham for the next year, also to administer oath to witnesses before grand enquest, and other witnesses” [PCR 4:43].

In Plymouth section of 1643 Plymouth Colony list of men able to bear arms [PCR 8:188].

It is very likely that the following service belongs to his son of the same name: Eastham selectman, 5 June 1677, 5 June 1678, 3 June 1679, 1 June 1680, 7 June 1681, 6 June 1682, 6 June 1683, 3 June 1684, 2 June 1685 [PCR 5:230, 257, 6:10, 35, 59, 84, 108, 129, 164, 168, 186].

Eastham constable, 7 June 1676 [PCR 5:196].

Eastham highway surveyor, 5 June 1672, 3 June 1673, 5 June 1677 [PCR 5:93, 115, 232].

Deputy for Eastham, 6 June 1682 [PCR 6:85].

ESTATE: “John Done” was assessed £1 7s. in the Plymouth tax lists of 25 March 1633 and 27 March 1634 [PCR 1:9, 27].

On 14 February 1633/4 purchased of John Coombs for £9 10s. “a dwelling house & misted with the inclosure & outhousing thereunto belonging” [PCR 1:25].

Allotted mowing ground, 14 March 1635/6, 20 March 1636/7 [PCR 1:40, 56].

On 30 December 1636 whereas “the now dwelling house with all & singular the outhousing, lands & enclosures in the use & occupation of John Done, of Plymouth, near unto Plain Dealing, were in parnership between the said John Done & John Atwood, late of London, gent., now know ye that upon accounts between the said Joh. & John, the said John Atwood, for & in consideration of threescore pounds, hath bought out the said John Done, his heirs & assigns, so that it remaineth wholly to the said John Atwood & his heirs forever” [PCR 1:47].

On 2 October 1637 granted ten acres “to belong to his house at Plymouth”, and one hundred acres at Jones River [PCR 1:65-66].

On 4 December 1637 he was granted ten acres [PCR 1:69].

On 4 February 1638/9 he was granted one hundred acres, partly to make up for portions of an earlier grant which he had remitted [PCR 1:111-12].

On 1 June 1640 he was granted ten acres of meadow [PCR 1:154].

On 2 November 1640 he was granted ten acres meadow in the North Meadow [PCR 1:166].

On 7 April 1642, “Mr. John Done” sold to Mr. William Bradford for four goats, a garden in Plymouth, also three acres of marsh bought of Thomas Willet [PCR 12:79].

On 19 February 1645/6, “Mr. John Done” sold to Mr. William Hanbury of Plymouth his dwelling house and garden places, barn and buildings, with all the fruit trees, the corn now growing in the garden excepted with some half dozen small fruit trees, to be given to Doane in the fall or spring [PCR 12:133-34].

On 6 October 1657, Mr. John Done and others petitioned to acquire land thirteen English miles from Rehoboth, and the court gave them permission to purchase it from the Indians [PCR 3:123]. On 1 June 1658, a portion of land was granted by the Court to “Mr. John Done” and others, between Bridgewater and Weymouth [PCR 3:142].

On 5 June 1666 the court, having granted him one hundred acres of upland at “Pottamumaquate Neck” and six acres of meadow there, ordered Lt. Freeman and Josias Cooke to view and buy it for him [PCR 4:131].

On 1 April 1659 “Mr. John Done” of Eastham, yeoman, “with the consent of his wife mistris Lydia Done,” sold to “Mrs. Allis Bradford Senior of Plymouth, widow, … all that his tract and parcel of land lying at Jones River in the township of Plymouth aforesaid, being an hundred acres” of upland and meadow, which had been sold to William Bradford Senior during his lifetime but not confirmed until this date [ PCLR 2:2:20]. By the time Bradford’s son Joseph took this land, the boundaries were lost and it had to be re-surveyed in 1699 [ PTR 1:268-69].

At an unknown date (but acknowledged 2 July 1669) “John Doan” of Eastham, husbandman, exchanged land with “Richard Higgens” of Eastham, Doane receiving three acres of meadow and Higgins receiving four acres of meadow at Billingsgate [PCLR 5:140].

On 23 December 1681 “John Done Gent., tailor, of Eastham” for “love and natural affection” gave to “my daughter Abigaill Done … my dwelling house with all the upland about the said house,” about twelve acres, with two acres of meadow, in Eastham [PCLR 5:89].

In his will, dated 18 May 1678 and proved 2 June 1686, “John Doane of Eastham, aged eighty and eight years or there about,” bequeathed to “my loving wife” my dwelling house in Eastham with all the upland and meadow about it and two acres at a place called the Acres, and all personal estate for life; to “daughter Abigail Doane” the house and land at her mother’s death; to “son John Doane,” sole executor, twenty-seven acres of upland, eight acres at Poche Island, all my right in Eastham being a town purchaser, also one hundred acres granted by the Plymouth court “by his majesty’s order invested with power to do equity and justice to his poor distressed subjects”, also my great table and form; to “son Daniel Doane” the land he now lives on and twenty acres near the dry swamp and four and a half acres of meadow; to “son Ephraim Doane” twenty acres of upland and four acres of meadow at Little Billingsgate; to “granddaughter Margaret Hicks” a trunk and a pair of sheets; residue at wife’s death divided equally among all the sons and daughters [ MD 3:177, citing BarnPR 1:10].

The inventory of “Mr. John Doane deceased the 21th of February 1685 aged about a hundred years” was taken 21 May 1686 by Joseph Snow and Joshua Bangs and totalled £10 16s. 7d. [MD 3:178, citing BarnPR 1:11].

BIRTH: About 1590 (based on age given when he wrote his will).
DEATH: Eastham 21 February 1685[/6] [MD 3:178, citing BarnPR 1:11], “aged about a hundred years” [sic].
MARRIAGE: (1) By 4 December 1648 Ann _____ (and by 1625 if she was the mother of his children) (signed a deed dated 4 December 1648 [ Dawes-Gates 304, citing Eastham TR]); she died by 1659.
(2) By 1 April 1659 Lydia_____ [MD 13:232, citing PCLR 2:2:20]. She was living on 18 May 1678 when she was named in her husband’s will, but was presumably deceased by 23 December 1681 when property he left to her in the will was deeded by him to his daughter Abigail [PCLR 5:89].

CHILDREN:
i LYDIA, b. say 1625; m. Plymouth 11 September 1645 Samuel Hicks [PCR 2:88], son of ROBERT HICKS.

ii ABIGAIL, b. about 1631; m. in early 1690s Samuel Lothrop of Norwich, son of Rev. John Lothrop; d. Norwich 23 January 1734/5 “in the 104th year if her age” [Norwich Hist 218, illustration of tombstone]. “Mrs. Abigail Lothrop died at Norwich Jan. 23, 1735 in her 104th year. Her father John Done and his wife came to Plymouth in 1630, and there she was born the next year. She lived single till 60 years old and then married Mr. John Lothrop [mistake for Samuel Lothrop] of Norwich, who lived ten years and then died” [Norwich Hist 578, citing Boston Weekly Journal]. (Ferris gives a birthdate of 13 January 1631/2 which is not found in the records, and may be an inaccurate calculation based on the tombstone [Dawes-Gates 2:305].)

iii JOHN, b. say 1635; m. (1) Eastham 30 April 1662 Hannah Bangs [MD 8:89], daughter of EDWARD BANGS; m. (2) 14 January 1684[/5] Rebecca Pettee [MD 8:89].

iv DANIEL, b. about 1637 (d. Eastham 20 December 1712 in his 76th year [MD 8:3]); m. (1) by 1669 _____ _____ (child b. 7 March 1669/70 [PCR 8:57; MD 19:111]); m. (2) after 28 July 1682 Hepsibah (Cole) Crispe. (Hepzibah Cole, daughter of Daniel Cole of Eastham, had married at Eastham 24 May 1677 George Crisp, and he had died there 28 July 1682 [MD 3:180]; in the distribution of the estate of Daniel Cole, dated 15 January 1694/5, the list of heirs included “Daniel Doan and his wife Hipsibath” [MD 23:67, citing BarnPR 1:107; see also Dawes-Gates 2:305].)

v EPHRAIM, b. say 1642; m. (1) Eastham 5 February 1667[/8] Mercy Knowles [PCR 8:57]; m. (2) after 1692 Mary (Smalley) Snow.

ASSOCIATIONS: Twice in the 1630s John Doane acted jointly with John Atwood of London. On 8 April 1633, as agent of Mr. John Atwood of London, John Doane sold to Henry Howland the remaining time of Walter Harris [PCR 1:12-13]. Doane and Atwood had held a piece of land as partners, but on 30 December 1636, probably not long after he had arrived in New England, Atwood bought out Doane [PCR 1:47]. They do not seem to have interacted after that date.

The widow Martha Harding may have been John Doane’s sister [Dawes-Gates 2:302].
COMMENTS: On 28 October 1633 “John Done” presented the inventory of Martha Harding [PCR 1:18], and on 11 November 1633, with Stephen Hopkins, the inventory of Godbert Godbertson and Sarah his wife [PCR 1:19].

On 11 November 1633 Mary Brown, daughter of PETER BROWN, deceased, was placed with “Mr. Joh. Done” for nine years [PCR 1:18]. On 10 October 1644, when Mary Brown had reached seventeen, her portion, which had been in Doane’s hands, was ordered given to John Browne of Duxbury [PCR 2:76].

On 7 June 1636 “John Done, yeoman, entereth an account of slander, & layeth it in an £100, against Helin Billington, widow” [PCR 1:41]; the defendant was fined £5 and ordered “to be set in the stocks & be whipped” [PCR 1:42].

A “John Done,” sixteen years old, sailed from London for New England on the True Love in 1635, and Pope thinks this is the son of the immigrant, but 1635 is very close to the year of birth of the son of the immigrant, so the 1635 passenger must be someone else.

Filed under: Doane/Doan, Family Files, Genealogy, , , , , ,

Deacon John Doane

Deacon John Doane


IN MEMORY OF JOHN DOANE

FOUNDER OF THE DOANE FAMILY IN AMERICA

BORN ABOUT 1590 – DIED FEBRUARY 1 1685

CAME TO PLYMOUTH ABOUT 1630 WHERE HE WAS DEACON OF THE CHURCH; DEPUTY TO THE GENERAL COURT; ONE OF THE ASSISTANTS TO THE GOVERNOR; MEMBER OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVISE THE LAWS IN 1636; ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF EASTHAM IN 1644; DEACON OF THE FIRST CHURCH HERE AND DEPUTY TO THE COURT.

ERECTED BY HIS DESCENDANTS 1907


(plaque in Eastam Town Hall)

MR. JOHN DOANE WHO CAME TO PLYMOUTH ABOUT 1630. HE WAS ONE OF THE LEADERS OF THE COLONY, TWICE ASSISTANT TO THE GOVERNOR, MEMBER OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVISE THE LAWS IN 1636 AND DEACON OF THE CHURCH AT PLYMOUTH. IN 1644 HE REMOVED TO NAUSET AND WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF THE TOWN NOW EASTHAM. HE SERVED THE TOWN AS DEACON OF THE FIRST CHURCH, JUSTICE OF PEACE, MEMBER OF THE FIRST BOARD OF SELECTMEN, DEPUTY TO THE COLONY COURT AND HELD MANY OTHER IMPORTANT PUBLIC OFFICES. A MAN OF WISDOM, INTEGRITY AND DEEP PIETY, HE GAVE HIMSELF UNRESERVEDLY TO THE WELL BEING OF HIS FELLOW MEN AND THE BEST INTERESTS OF THE COMMUNITY. HIS HOUSE STOOD ON THE NORTH SIDE OF TOWN COVE WHERE HE DIED FEBRUARY 21ST 1685 AGED ABOUT NINETY FIVE YEARS. FEW MEN HAVE SERVED THEIR TOWN SO LONG AND FAITHFULLY.

THIS TABLET IS ERECTED TO HIS HONOR BY THE DOANE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA AUGUST 26, 1916

This monument is in position JD on the EHS 1776 Cove survey map. A bronze plaque is attached to a large boulder. The boulder is approximately 52″ W, 52″ H and 22″ D. The gravestone plaque indicates John Doane died February 1, 1685. The Town Hall plaque indicates he died February 21, 1685.

John Doane 1685 – Homesite


1869 Marker

DEA.JOHN DOANE

B. 1590

Here 1644

D. 1685

1869 Marker – back side

DEA John Doane

1644

Erected by Hon. John Doane 1869


1994 Memorial Plaque PLACED BY THE DOANE FAMILY ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA TO COMMEMORATE THE 350TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE PILGRIM SETTLEMENT AT NAUSET IN 1644. IN THAT YEAR SEVEN FAMILIES REMOVED FROM PLIMOUTH PLANTATION TO FORM THE COMMUNITY THAT WAS INCORPORATED AS THE TOWN OF EASTHAM IN 1651.
WE REMEMBER THESE PILGRIM SETTLERS AND THE MANY GENERATIONS OF THEIR DESCENDANTS WHEN WE GATHER HERE.

BANGS COOK DOANE HIGGINS PRENCE SMALLEY SNOW

Doane Rock, on original property in Eastham.


Filed under: Doane/Doan, Family Files, Genealogy, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mignier dit Lagace & Tremblay-Romaine Records

Here are three generations of my ancestor’s records from Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatierre, Eboulements, and La Malbaie.

Marriage of Louis Mignier dit Lagace and Marie-Rosalie Richard, 1775

Marriage of Louis Mignier dit Lagace and Marie Richard 1802

Marriage of Pierre Tremblay (Romaine) and Helene Mignier dit Lagace

Baptism of Pierre Tremblay (Romaine)1798

Baptism of Helene Mignier dit Lagace, 1806

Pierre Tremblay family – Eboulements 1851

Filed under: Family Files, Genealogy, Tremblay, , , , , , , , ,

Francois-Louis Thibault & Elizabeth-Agnes Lefebvre

Francois-Louis Thibault was born June 28, 1647 in Sainte-Catherine-de-la-Flotte, Ile de Re, Aunis, France. He married Elizabeth-Agnes Lefebvre, a fille du roi, on October 14, 1670.

Filed under: Desbiens, Family Files, Genealogy, Tremblay, , , ,

My Grand-uncle Was My Muse

My grand-uncle, Fleming Hines, was the inspiration for my family history research, I can even recall the very date that I started, because it was his birthday, January 18, 2006, he was born January 18, 1897. I had no idea what day he was born until then. I just knew that he died during the First World War, still in his teens, and buried in France. He was a private in the 19th Battalion,Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment).
I feel that it was more than a coincidence that I was drawn to the military site, because it left me with a lot of questions about him. The story my grandfather told was that he was too young to enlist, so he lied about his age. I discovered that he has two attestation papers, with two different birth dates, and neither of them is the right year.
My grandfather went on tho say that he gave his life by jumping on a grenade to save several other soldiers’ lives. The truth, I do not know yet, I have the form to get his records, but I haven’t sent them in, I have been procrastinating about sending in the form to get the information for the simple reason that, I like the story about his being a hero, that’s the story that my dad grew up with and I grew up with, and I knew so little of my family history that it would be a disappointment if he died from an illness.
I know that he died in Etaples Military Hospital, September 18, 1916, and is burid in the Etaples Military Cemetery in gravesite reference: X E 8 and from further research about the campaigns in the area, he would have been in the Battle of Fleurs-Courselet, the first battle where army tanks were used, which was towards the end of the Battle of the Somme.
But, I’ve been researching my family history ever since that day and have learned that’s what family history research is all about, finding the truth, so I’m going to do it, I’m going to send for his military records and find out the truth, I think I’m ready. I think that My Uncle Fleming was a hero just for going over in the first place, he didn’t have to go, but he wanted too, to preserve his family’s way of life. He didn’t come home, it doesn’t make any difference how he died, he’s still a hero.


Here’s my grand-uncle’s memorial marker on the back of his parents’ gravestone,
the middle initial and dates are all wrong.


Filed under: Family Files, Genealogy, Haines/Hines, , , , ,

Fairbairn Family Reunion – 6 months away

The first Fairbairn Family reunion will be held this August in Amherstburg, Ontario. We are starting to get organized, gathering contact information, updating family information and fund-raising.

We have a Timmy’s challenge between the Ontario host families and the out-of-province host families. Everytime we go to Timmy’s, we set aside the price of a cup of coffee to go into the fund. We will be holding yard sales as soon as weather permits, I think my cousin will have hers earlier, she’s got warmer weather where she’s at in the B.C. interior. I think I will organize a multi-family yard sale, for the long weekend in May. I have to see what the best place will be to hold it, maybe at my brother’s house, he lives on the highway and there’s a lot of traffic.

We are also having a ‘slogan contest’ , we have to think of a family slogan to put on the t-shirts, the winner of the contest will be chosen by another cousin, who is designing the t-shirts, and he/she will get two free large t-shirts.

There will be a hand-painted family crest plaque with the winning slogan on it, to be raffled off. A couple of family members are going to get together and make a baby quilt and a full-sized quilt to be raffled off at the reunion as well, with tickets available soon.

Filed under: Fairbairn, Family Files, Genealogy, , , ,

Springnote for Genealogy Research

Springnote is a free online notebook which I am currently using to keep all of my research as an online back-up as well as to share it (it’s featured on the Springnote website). The Notebook can hold 2Gb. of storage and there is a limit of twelve notebooks per account. Files as large as 20 Mb can be uploaded and attached to individual pages. You can upload documents as large as 5Mb and they will be converted to a page in the notebook.

It is easy to insert images and videos as well as some widgets. There are different templates for specialized pages in the notebook such as slideshows, book lists, reports, schedules, calendars, recipes etc. You can even export pages to blog posts and import your blog.

I have my notebook set up with sub-pages and some pages that are used often are easily bookmarked. I can rearrange my pages anytime by dragging and dropping the pages where I want them. I can easily pick up where I left off previously by selecting the Updates. I can search the notebook in the search box or tags. When I’m done, I will have all of my research online, with easy access to what I’m looking for.

As I further my research, I am going to be using my notebook to store it in, it is very convenient. I have decided that, when I have all of the information and sources that I have on my computer, I can download the whole thing and put it on a thumb drive.

Filed under: Genealogy, Research Resources, , , , , ,

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