Ancestral Notes

My Family History blog

Loyalist Settlers Of The Lost Villages

I had writer’s block, so I decided to pick a year and see what happened in that year of any genealogical significance. I decided to pick the year of my birth, and googled for any events in that year. What I found was that some of the villages on the St. Lawrence River that were founded by early loyalists are now at the bottom of the river.

The Loyalist settlers of this area were disbanded military of the King’s Royal Rangers and Butler’s Rangers. “The Lost Villages” as they are known, consist of Mille Roches, Moulinette, Wales, Dickinson’s Landing, Farran’s Point, and Aultsville and the hamlets of Maple Grove, Santa Cruz and Woodlands.

On July 1, 1958, while the rest of the country was celebrating Canada Day the inhabitants of these villages were watching as the places they called home were lost forever under the waters of the St.Lawrence in the name of progress.


THE LOYALIST SETTLERS AT MILLE ROCHES

William Claws (Clause) was born in America in 1765, enlisted with the KRRNY on November 13, 1781, and was ranked as an ensign. He was promoted to Lieutenant on August 24, 1783 and was the eighth senior lieutenant in the regiment until its disbandment in 1783. He originally settled in Montreal in 1784, but by 1786 had settled in Royal Township #2.


Abraham Marsh was born circa 1750 and died at Mille Roches, Cornwall Township, on May 8, 1833. He married Catherine French, daughter of Jeremiah French of Maple Grove. On the April 3, 1790 Muster Roll for Cornwall and Osnabruck, Abraham Marsh is listed in Captain Jeremiah French’s Company. He was formerly of the 84th Regiment (Royal Highland Emigrants). Abraham Marsh was buried in Maple Grove Cemetery and his remains and gravestone were moved to the new Maple Grove Cemetery, (Vincent Massey Drive, Cornwall) prior to the inundation of July 1, 1958.

THE LOYALIST SETTLERS OF MOULINETTE

James Forsyth was a Corporal in the King’s Royal Regiment of New York. He settled on Lot No. 30, Royal Township #2, (Cornwall Township) in 1784, with his wife and two daughters.

Jacob Summers was a Corporal in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York, Captain John McDonell’s Company, in 1777. He was a Light Infantryman in 1781 and 1782, and was appointed Corporal of same in 1783. Although drawing a lot in Royal Township #1, (Charlottenburg Township), he was on Lot #30, Concession #1, Township of Cornwall, in 1786.

Barnabus Spencer was born in America in 1761 and his occupation was farming. He enlisted in the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on August 15, 1778. He was a Sergeant in Captain Joseph Anderson’s Company, First Battalion, in 1781 and 1782, and was a Corporal in the Light Infantry in 1783. In 1786, Sergeant Spencer had settled on the east 1/2 of Lot 31, Royal Township #2, (Cornwall Township).

John Connolly was born in Ireland and enlisted in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on November 16, 1781. On that date he was ranked as Ensign, and on November 15, 1782, he was Ensign in Captain Patrick Daly’s Company.

Sir John Johnson, Knight and baronet, was born in America in 1742, and enlisted in the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on June 19, 1776. In 1759, he was a Cadet in the New York Provincials, and by 1763 he was Captain. He was Major-General of the Northern District, New York Militia, in 1776. He was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel and Captain of the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on June 19, 1776, and of the Second Battalion on June 21, 1780. He attained his highest rank as Brigadier-General on October 1, 1782. By 1784, he had acquired lots at Cataraqui, Montreal and Royal Township #1. By 1784, he had married Mary (Polly) Watts and was the father of four sons and one daughter. On March 14, 1782, Johnson was appointed Superintendent and Inspector-General of Indian Affairs and on May 17, 1784, he was appointed Superintendent-General of Refugee Loyalists.

THE LOYALISTS AT DICKINSON’S LANDING

Doctor James Stuart (Discussed under Wales)

James Crowder was a private in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York. He was in Lieutenant-Colonel John Butler’s Corps of Rangers from 1777 to 1781, and in Captain Alexander McDonnell’s First Battalion in 1783. He was a farmer from Susquehanna River, New York, the son of William Crowder sr. He settled in Royal Township #3 with his wife, son, and two daughters.

Jacob Eamon was born in America in 1760 and enlisted in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on May 22, 1780. He was in Captain John Munro’s Company from 1781 to 1783, and in Captain Archibald McDonell’s Company in 1783. He was a farmer in New York.

Joseph Eamon (No information), Possibly the son of Jacob Eamon above.

James Morden (Mordin) was born in America in 1764, and enlisted in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on May 5, 1779. He was in Captain Joseph Anderson’s Company until December 24, 1782, and then Captain Archibald McDonell’s Company in 1783. James Morden was the son of Joseph Morden, from the Mohawk River.

Joseph Fitchet (Fetchet) was born in America in 1765, and enlisted in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on May 16, 1780, as a Private. He was in Captain Joseph Anderson’s Company until December 24, 1782, and then Captain Archibald McDonell’s Company in 1783. His occupation was that of a tailor in New York state.

THE LOYALIST SETTLER OF WALES

Dr. James Stuart was born in Scotland. He enlisted with the 42nd Regiment of Foot in 1766, and served as a surgeon’s mate until his emigration to America. He enlisted with the KRRNY on August 18, 1777. Upon disbandment of the regiment in 1783, he had served for a total of fourteen years under the British ensign. Dr. Stuart had settled in New Stamford, Ulster County, New York. He was a practicing physician in Wales.

THE LOYALIST SETTLERS OF FARRAN’S POINT

Peter Everitt was born in America and enlisted in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on October 28, 1776. He achieved the rank of Second Senior Lieutenant. He was a Volunteer in the Colonel’s Company, Sir John Johnson, in 1776, and promoted to Ensign in the Major’s Company, Major James Gray, on August 24, 1777. He was promoted to Lieutenant on November 14, 1781, and was Lieutenant of the Grenadiers from 1781 to 1783. Peter Everitt was a farmer in New York state.

Jacob Farrand (Farent), was born in America, and enlisted in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on November 2, 1777. He achieved the rank of Seventh Senior Lieutenant in the Regiment. He was a Volunteer in Major James Gray’s Company from 1777-1781. He was promoted to Ensign in this company in 1782, and promoted to Lieutenant on December 25, 1882. He was a Lieutenant in Captain John Munro’s Company in 1783. Jacob Farrand was a nephew of Major James Gray.

THE LOYALIST SETTLERS OF AULTSVILLE

William Empey was born in America in 1759 and enlisted with the Kings Royal Regiment of New York (KRRNY) as a private soldier on August 15, 1777. He originally served with Capt. Angus McDonnell’s Company, and then served as a light infantryman under Capt. Steven Watts until 1781. In 1782 and 1783, he served with Capt. Patrick Daly’s Company. William, a carpenter by trade, was the son of Philip Empey Sr., of Stone Arabia, New York. He settled in Royal Township #2 with his wife, Catterina Von Hildenbrandt, and their two sons.

Abraham Freeze was born in America in 1757 and enlisted with the KRRNY on January 22, 1777 as a private soldier. He originally served in Capt. Stephen Watts Light Company, and later as a grenadier with Capt. Jon McDonald’s Grenadier Company. In 1779, he served as a scout to the Mohawk Valley, prior to the 1780 raid on Johnstown and the subsequent burning of the valley. Abraham was a farmer in New York State before moving to Canada.

Francis Albrant (Albraut) was born in America in 1754 and enlisted as a Private in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on June 19, 1776. He was a Grenadier in 1782 and 1783. He was a farmer from Tryon County, New York.

Alexander Rose (Ross) was born in Scotland in 1760 and enlisted as a Drummer in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on September 13, 1779. He was a Drummer from 1781 to 1783. Alexander Rose was a farmer in New York state.

Michael Ault (Alt) was born in America in 1759 and enlisted as a Private in the First Battalion of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York on May 6, 1777. He served as a Grenadier from 1781 to 1783 and was also a farmer from Tryon County, New York.

Loyalist Settler of Hamlet of Maple Grove

Captain Jeremiah French, late of the Kings Royal Regiment of New York, and of Manchester, Vermont, settled the hamlet of Maple Grove in 1784. French built a magnificent house at the mouth of Robertson Creek and later sold it to his son-in-law George Robertson, also a UEL refugee from Vermont. The French-Robertson House can now be viewed at Upper Canada Village.

Captain French originally served with the Queens Loyal Rangers and was taken prisoner by the Americans at the battle of Bennington. As a condition of his release, he was ordered not to take up arms against the rebel uprising in Vermont, so he made his way to New York and subsequently joined the KRRNY, under command of Sir John Johnson.

The Lost Villages Historical Society has a lot of great photos and stories from the people that once lived in the villages.


Ancestral Notes by Earline Hines Bradt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.

Filed under: Lost Villages, St. Lawrence Seaway, United Empire Loyalist

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